Issaquah-Pine Lake Road Improvements Project

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Two cars driving away from the camera on Issaquah-Pine Lake Road.

Thank you to everyone who filled out our survey! The survey is now closed, but you can read through the revised design highlights, explore what we’ve heard from community members, and ask any questions below. Please check back for project updates and/or subscribe to our project email list – just look for the “STAY INFORMED” box on this page!



Project overview

The City of Sammamish plans to improve Issaquah-Pine Lake Road Southeast from Southeast 32nd Way to Southeast 44th Street (see the map below). Issaquah-Pine Lake Road is a critical corridor for existing and new residential developments, multiple schools, and commercial areas. The project will aim to improve traffic flow and safety for all users.

Map showing project area. Issaquah-Pine Lake Road Southeast is highlighted from Southeast 32nd Way until Southeast 44th Street. There is a roundabout at the north end of the project area near Sunny Hills Elementary School. Pine Lake Middle School and Sunny Hills Elementary School lie north of the project area. Future Elementary School number 16 lies to the southeast.



Check out the revised design!

Our team has incorporated two rounds of public input into our design to improve the Issaquah-Pine Lake Road corridor. We are now at 60% design, meaning that most of the big elements are already set, but there is room to provide input on the finer details.

Please review the proposed improvements below and ask any questions at the bottom of the page. You can also download a PDF of the full 60% design (For questions or more information about these details, please contact Jed Ireland at 425-295-0563 or jireland@sammamish.us.).

Proposed improvements

*Indicates a new addition or emphasized element based on our last round of public input.

Create a multimodal roadway for people who walk, roll, drive, bike, and ride public transit.

  • Include 5-foot wide bike lanes and six-foot wide sidewalks on both sides of the road for the entire project length*
  • Maintain current bus stops locations and add 12-foot wide sidewalks to provide waiting area*
  • Add signaled crosswalks at Southeast 44th Street, Southeast Klahanie Boulevard, Southeast 42nd Street, Southeast 37th Place, and Southeast 32nd Way*
  • Minimize impacts to trees*
  • Maintain one travel lane in each direction from Southeast 32nd Way to Southeast Klahanie Boulevard (with additional turn lanes or pockets where needed)
  • Maintain two travel lanes in each direction from Southeast Klahanie Boulevard to Southeast 44th Street (with additional turn lanes or pockets where needed)

two different cross-sections of Issaquah-Pine Lake Road. The first is a three-lane section with center turn lane.

Click here to see a larger version of the illustration above.

Improve safety for all users.

  • Add a landscaped buffer to separate sidewalks from the roadway where possible without impacting trees*
  • Install a new signal with a crosswalk at Southeast 37th Place for people crossing to the bus stop*
  • Increase roadway lighting, using LED lighting that minimize impacts to nearby residents*
  • Building a raised landscaped center median at select areas of the corridor
  • Reduce median from 10 feet to 8 feet, providing additional space for emergency vehicles*

Improve intersection performance.

  • Replace the roundabout at Southeast 32nd Way with a traffic signal
  • Allow for southbound to northbound U-turns at the Southeast 32nd Way intersection*
  • Add traffic signals at Southeast 37th Place and Southeast 44th Street
  • Add left-turn pockets and two-way left turn lanes for most of the project length*
  • Add right-turn pockets where necessary

Incorporate water quality upgrades.

  • Create flow-control and water quality improvements within Laughing Jacobs Basin
  • Add fish-passable culverts at Laughing Jacobs Creek and Stream C

Working with the community

Since 2018, we’ve reached out to area residents, schools, churches, businesses, community groups, and organizations to learn about their priorities for people who live, walk, use a wheelchair, bike, drive, and ride transit on Issaquah-Pine Lake Road.

Community meeting at a school auditorium. Audience of about 30 to 40 people are looking forward at project presentation.

In fall 2018, the City developed a preliminary design to improve the Issaquah-Pine Lake Road corridor and gathered input through stakeholder interviews, a public meeting, and an online survey. The results from that first round of feedback informed a new, more detailed design that we shared with the community in early 2020. At that point, we gathered community input again through interviews, a public meeting, and an online survey and Q&A. We incorporated the results of that second round of public input in the 60% design.

What we’ve heard so far

Below we have summarized the major public input themes. Major themes are drawn from public comments that appeared six or more times. You can delve into more details and see how the City responded to each theme in our 30% Design Outreach Summary.

  • Broad support for the project design and improvements
  • Desire to see improvements made on Issaquah-Pine Lake Road to help reduce congestion (particularly during school drop-off and pick-up times) and increase safety
  • Emphasis on improving intersections and turns from and onto Issaquah-Pine Lake Road for all users, particularly near key locations such as schools
  • Skepticism that the two- to three-lane configuration in the proposed design is sufficient for current and future traffic levels, even with other improvements to traffic flow
  • Mixed views on roundabouts versus traffic signals, but overall, more support for traffic signals
  • Request to consider bus stop pull-outs for King County Metro buses so that they do not block traffic
  • Support for proposed bicycle improvements; suggestions to create greater distance between bicycle and traffic lanes to avoid conflicts between people who drive and bike
  • Appreciation for pedestrian infrastructure proposed in the design, including improved sidewalks and crosswalks
  • Push to avoid cutting trees along Issaquah-Pine Lake Road for project purposes and to add more trees along project corridor
  • Suggestion to extend the project area to include Issaquah-Pine Lake Road further south through the intersection with Issaquah-Fall City Road and beyond
  • Request to reduce existing and potential noise and light pollution along the project corridor
  • Urging to minimize construction duration and impacts to the community
  • Appeal for project to continue to inform and involve the public in the decision-making process, including diverse communities in the area, such as South Asian American and Chinese American communities


Next steps

The Issaquah-Pine Lake Road Improvements project is at 60% design. As mentioned above, most of the big elements are already set, but we are still refining the details. We have collected some public input through our fall survey and will announce future opportunities to share your thoughts in 2021. In the meantime, you can ask questions below and/or contact Jed Ireland at 425-295-0563 or jireland@sammamish.us.

The City will review and consider feedback from community members for 90% design. Once the we finalize the design and complete the nearby Issaquah-Fall City Road project construction, we will acquire necessary right of way and begin construction.



Thank you to everyone who filled out our survey! The survey is now closed, but you can read through the revised design highlights, explore what we’ve heard from community members, and ask any questions below. Please check back for project updates and/or subscribe to our project email list – just look for the “STAY INFORMED” box on this page!



Project overview

The City of Sammamish plans to improve Issaquah-Pine Lake Road Southeast from Southeast 32nd Way to Southeast 44th Street (see the map below). Issaquah-Pine Lake Road is a critical corridor for existing and new residential developments, multiple schools, and commercial areas. The project will aim to improve traffic flow and safety for all users.

Map showing project area. Issaquah-Pine Lake Road Southeast is highlighted from Southeast 32nd Way until Southeast 44th Street. There is a roundabout at the north end of the project area near Sunny Hills Elementary School. Pine Lake Middle School and Sunny Hills Elementary School lie north of the project area. Future Elementary School number 16 lies to the southeast.



Check out the revised design!

Our team has incorporated two rounds of public input into our design to improve the Issaquah-Pine Lake Road corridor. We are now at 60% design, meaning that most of the big elements are already set, but there is room to provide input on the finer details.

Please review the proposed improvements below and ask any questions at the bottom of the page. You can also download a PDF of the full 60% design (For questions or more information about these details, please contact Jed Ireland at 425-295-0563 or jireland@sammamish.us.).

Proposed improvements

*Indicates a new addition or emphasized element based on our last round of public input.

Create a multimodal roadway for people who walk, roll, drive, bike, and ride public transit.

  • Include 5-foot wide bike lanes and six-foot wide sidewalks on both sides of the road for the entire project length*
  • Maintain current bus stops locations and add 12-foot wide sidewalks to provide waiting area*
  • Add signaled crosswalks at Southeast 44th Street, Southeast Klahanie Boulevard, Southeast 42nd Street, Southeast 37th Place, and Southeast 32nd Way*
  • Minimize impacts to trees*
  • Maintain one travel lane in each direction from Southeast 32nd Way to Southeast Klahanie Boulevard (with additional turn lanes or pockets where needed)
  • Maintain two travel lanes in each direction from Southeast Klahanie Boulevard to Southeast 44th Street (with additional turn lanes or pockets where needed)

two different cross-sections of Issaquah-Pine Lake Road. The first is a three-lane section with center turn lane.

Click here to see a larger version of the illustration above.

Improve safety for all users.

  • Add a landscaped buffer to separate sidewalks from the roadway where possible without impacting trees*
  • Install a new signal with a crosswalk at Southeast 37th Place for people crossing to the bus stop*
  • Increase roadway lighting, using LED lighting that minimize impacts to nearby residents*
  • Building a raised landscaped center median at select areas of the corridor
  • Reduce median from 10 feet to 8 feet, providing additional space for emergency vehicles*

Improve intersection performance.

  • Replace the roundabout at Southeast 32nd Way with a traffic signal
  • Allow for southbound to northbound U-turns at the Southeast 32nd Way intersection*
  • Add traffic signals at Southeast 37th Place and Southeast 44th Street
  • Add left-turn pockets and two-way left turn lanes for most of the project length*
  • Add right-turn pockets where necessary

Incorporate water quality upgrades.

  • Create flow-control and water quality improvements within Laughing Jacobs Basin
  • Add fish-passable culverts at Laughing Jacobs Creek and Stream C

Working with the community

Since 2018, we’ve reached out to area residents, schools, churches, businesses, community groups, and organizations to learn about their priorities for people who live, walk, use a wheelchair, bike, drive, and ride transit on Issaquah-Pine Lake Road.

Community meeting at a school auditorium. Audience of about 30 to 40 people are looking forward at project presentation.

In fall 2018, the City developed a preliminary design to improve the Issaquah-Pine Lake Road corridor and gathered input through stakeholder interviews, a public meeting, and an online survey. The results from that first round of feedback informed a new, more detailed design that we shared with the community in early 2020. At that point, we gathered community input again through interviews, a public meeting, and an online survey and Q&A. We incorporated the results of that second round of public input in the 60% design.

What we’ve heard so far

Below we have summarized the major public input themes. Major themes are drawn from public comments that appeared six or more times. You can delve into more details and see how the City responded to each theme in our 30% Design Outreach Summary.

  • Broad support for the project design and improvements
  • Desire to see improvements made on Issaquah-Pine Lake Road to help reduce congestion (particularly during school drop-off and pick-up times) and increase safety
  • Emphasis on improving intersections and turns from and onto Issaquah-Pine Lake Road for all users, particularly near key locations such as schools
  • Skepticism that the two- to three-lane configuration in the proposed design is sufficient for current and future traffic levels, even with other improvements to traffic flow
  • Mixed views on roundabouts versus traffic signals, but overall, more support for traffic signals
  • Request to consider bus stop pull-outs for King County Metro buses so that they do not block traffic
  • Support for proposed bicycle improvements; suggestions to create greater distance between bicycle and traffic lanes to avoid conflicts between people who drive and bike
  • Appreciation for pedestrian infrastructure proposed in the design, including improved sidewalks and crosswalks
  • Push to avoid cutting trees along Issaquah-Pine Lake Road for project purposes and to add more trees along project corridor
  • Suggestion to extend the project area to include Issaquah-Pine Lake Road further south through the intersection with Issaquah-Fall City Road and beyond
  • Request to reduce existing and potential noise and light pollution along the project corridor
  • Urging to minimize construction duration and impacts to the community
  • Appeal for project to continue to inform and involve the public in the decision-making process, including diverse communities in the area, such as South Asian American and Chinese American communities


Next steps

The Issaquah-Pine Lake Road Improvements project is at 60% design. As mentioned above, most of the big elements are already set, but we are still refining the details. We have collected some public input through our fall survey and will announce future opportunities to share your thoughts in 2021. In the meantime, you can ask questions below and/or contact Jed Ireland at 425-295-0563 or jireland@sammamish.us.

The City will review and consider feedback from community members for 90% design. Once the we finalize the design and complete the nearby Issaquah-Fall City Road project construction, we will acquire necessary right of way and begin construction.


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    Does the new design also meet the cities new ADA accessibility goals?

    jacobscreekboard asked 4 months ago

    Yes, the new design will meet the City’s ADA accessibility goals.  All curb ramps will be retrofitted to comply with the Federal standards and the project will include 6’ wide sidewalks on both sides of the IPLR through the entire corridor.

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    I don't see any mention of the new school elementary 16 that will be between Klahanie BLVD and fall city rd - how will that affect the choice between roundabouts and lights and public transit stops? Also what about speed updates in that area?

    jacobscreekboard asked 4 months ago

    Elementary 16 will have a driveway access directly across from SE 44th St and the intersection will need to be upgraded to a controlled intersection.  With Klahanie Blvd and SE 44th both needing to be controlled intersections, it is the recommendation of our designer that we install signals at both intersections. The signals will include ITS (Intelligent Traffic Systems) technology allowing the signals to talk to one another for the best possible traffic flow. The existing public transit stops will remain. There is no change in speed limit through the corridor.

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    Are there considerations to add flashing school lights, photo enforcement, and 20mph signs around Sunny Hills Elementary School? This highly trafficked area is dangerous for our young children, especially when drivers speed north-south and regularly exceed 35mph, let alone 20mph in school zones.

    Concerned Mom asked 11 months ago

    There are currently school zone flashers surrounding Sunny Hills Elementary and a 20 mph speed limit sign with flashers across from the school entrance.

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    Hi! Is it too late to ask for consideration of a fencing barrier along the small pond outside / alongside Issaquah-Pine Lk Rd to one entrance to Klahanie Blvd? The small pond shows no barrier between drivers and itself. In the hopeful unlikely event of any driver going into the pond, I do believe it be of public interest to consider a barrier of any sort. Thanks for the consideration!

    Minky123! asked 9 months ago

    The design does not include traffic barrier, but will provide curbing against the new sidewalk which will improve the edge condition for errant vehicles.

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    For drivers turning left (heading southbound) from SE 40th Pl to IPLR, visibility is difficult due to a slight hill and the increased speed of the drivers heading northbound. Has the City looked at flattening the hill and increasing the sight distance for this intersection?

    d.arakaki asked 8 months ago

    The design consultant did evaluate the site distance at this location and found it to meet design standards.

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    Who is responsible for the obsolete design of a two lane plus road in lieu of a four lane plus one?

    nancyswhitten asked 11 months ago

    The technical analysis for future traffic volumes demonstrates that two lanes are sufficient for this roadway section, and more lanes would be unnecessarily expensive without a significant benefit. The level of service on this section of the corridor is governed primarily by intersection performance. That changes south of SE Klahanie Blvd, where the volumes from Klahanie neighborhoods will benefit from the capacity of four lanes.

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    There is a bus stop on the west side of IPLR at approximately SE 40th Pl. Has the City looked at putting in a crosswalk at this location because there are no crosswalks to cross IPLR that are close by?

    d.arakaki asked 8 months ago

    Our design encourages pedestrians to use the crosswalks at the improved signalized intersection at SE 42nd and new signal at SE 37th, which are nearby. 

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    What is your projected timing for improvements to Issaquah Pine Lk Rd from Klahanie Blvd. south to SE 48?

    John asked 6 months ago

    Hello and thank you for your question. The segment of Issaquah Pine Lk Rd from SE Klahanie Blvd. to SE 48th St. is at the southern limit of the project which is identified as phase 2 of the project in our long-term plan. This phase is currently not identified in our 6-year Transportation Improvement Plan (TIP). It is planned but it likely will not happen in the next 6 years.

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    Does your traffic projection/analysis take into account how many people U turn at 32nd roundabout to go back up into Sunny Hills Elementary? The lights will need to give a priority to these people coming down the hill from PLMS, otherwise they will never be able to U-turn given the quantity of traffic coming up from Fall-City Road all the time. Most traffic projections will assume there is a left turn into the school, when cars arrive at their destination, but you cannot here and it would be unsafe to change that. The roundabout keeps all parents moving during drop off and pick up.

    Schoolmom asked over 1 year ago

    Yes, our traffic modeling did take into account the U-turns that occur at the SE 32nd Street roundabout.  When we collected our traffic counts, we counted 35 vehicles making the U-turn in the morning peak hour (presumably those would be the parents dropping students off at the elementary school), and 10 vehicles making the U-turn in the evening peak hour. The signal timing that we are designing the intersection for assumes that the southbound U-turn movement would be a protected movement.


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    Have you considered a combination walking/bidirectional bike path on one side of the road or other? This would be more friendly for young children and families and would enable safe cycling to schools (Sunny Hills, PLMS, and the new school near the Klahanie entrance). In addition, if extended to Fall City Road, this would connect with the existing path that leads to the Issaquah Highlands. Finally, if traffic speeds are slow enough, bike lanes in the roadway would only be needed on the uphill sides of the road. Slower cyclists could use the walking-bike path. Faster cyclists would use uphill bike lane or merge with auto traffic on the downhills.

    Jim Laudolff asked over 1 year ago

    Other areas of the City are planned to include shared use paths, but this road has not been planned to include them.