Issaquah-Pine Lake Road Improvements Project

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Photo of a section of Issaquah-Pine Lake Road with two cars driving past an intersection, on a sunny day.

COVID-19 Update: Note regarding Governor’s “Stay Home, Stay Healthy” order: At present, design for the Issaquah-Pine Lake Road project is proceeding on schedule, and we will keep you updated if there are any changes to our timeline. We expect to be able to share a summary of the feedback we received on our 30% design in the near future, and we’re working to incorporate ideas and suggestions into our upcoming 60% design.

Welcome

The City of Sammamish is planning improvements to Issaquah-Pine Lake Road SE from SE 32nd Way to SE 44th Street. The project will aim to improve traffic flow and safety for all users.


Why are improvements needed?

Issaquah-Pine Lake Road is a critical corridor for existing and new residential developments, multiple schools, and commercial areas. With these competing demands on the roadway, travelers experience significant delays during peak travel times.

In May 2018, the City of Sammamish began the Issaquah-Pine Lake Road Improvements Project. During the preliminary design phase, the City considered alternatives and developed a preliminary design for Issaquah-Pine Lake Road between SE 32nd Way and SE Klahanie Boulevard. The project area has since been extended to SE 44th Street as part of the 30% design.


Working with the community

Since 2018, we’ve reached out to area residents, schools, churches, businesses, community groups, and organizations to learn about their priorities for people who live, walk, bike, drive, and ride transit on Issaquah-Pine Lake Road.

In fall 2018, we elicited feedback on our preliminary design through an open house and online survey, and the input we received has impacted our 30% design.

What we've heard so far:

  • Desire to see improvements made on Issaquah-Pine Lake Road to help reduce congestion (particularly during school drop-off and pick-up times) and increase safety

  • Acknowledgement that the existing roundabout at SE 32nd Way is not working well, and broader preference for traffic signals at intersections instead of roundabouts

  • Emphasis on improving intersections and turns from and onto Issaquah-Pine Lake Road for all users

  • Appreciation for pedestrian infrastructure proposed in preliminary design, including improved sidewalks and crosswalks

  • Support for bike lanes as proposed in preliminary design

  • Interest in seeing improvements on Issaquah-Pine Lake Road outside the project area as well, especially from SE Klahanie Blvd to Issaquah-Fall City Road


What improvements are proposed?

We’re proposing improvements in our 30% design that incorporate feedback we've heard and help achieve our project goals. Click here to download a PDF (33 MB) of the full 30% design, or view the video below for a simulation of the proposed improvements.

Project goalsWhat we've incorporated in the design
Create a multimodal roadway for people who walk, drive, bike, and ride public transit
  • Maintaining one travel lane in either direction from SE 32nd Way to SE Klahanie Blvd
  • Maintaining two travel lanes in either direction from SE Klahanie Blvd to SE 44th St
  • Adding a bike lane in each direction and sidewalks where needed
Improve intersection performance
  • Replacing the roundabout at SE 32nd Way with a traffic signal
  • Adding a traffic signal at SE 37th Place
  • Adding right-turn pockets and left-turn lanes where necessary, for a total of 3 lanes between SE 32nd Way and SE Klahanie Blvd, and 5 lanes between SE Klahanie Blvd and SE 44th St
Improve safety for all users
  • Adding a landscaped buffer to separate sidewalks from roadway
  • Installing a new signal with crosswalk at SE 37th Pl for pedestrians crossing to the bus stop
  • Increasing roadway lighting
  • Building a raised landscaped center median at select areas of the corridor
Incorporate water quality upgrades
  • Creating flow-control and water quality improvements within Laughing Jacobs Basin
  • Adding fish-passable culverts at Laughing Jacobs Creek and Stream C




Next steps

The Issaquah-Pine Lake Road Improvements project is currently at the 30% design phase. Between December 2019 and February 2020, we shared the 30% design with the public through interviews with key stakeholders, an online survey, and a community meeting held on the corridor. We're currently reviewing the feedback we've received.

The City will continue to ask the community for feedback throughout the project design, and the input collected will influence the options carried forward. Once the design is finalized and the nearby Issaquah-Fall City Road project has completed construction, the City will acquire necessary right of way and begin construction.

COVID-19 Update: Note regarding Governor’s “Stay Home, Stay Healthy” order: At present, design for the Issaquah-Pine Lake Road project is proceeding on schedule, and we will keep you updated if there are any changes to our timeline. We expect to be able to share a summary of the feedback we received on our 30% design in the near future, and we’re working to incorporate ideas and suggestions into our upcoming 60% design.

Welcome

The City of Sammamish is planning improvements to Issaquah-Pine Lake Road SE from SE 32nd Way to SE 44th Street. The project will aim to improve traffic flow and safety for all users.


Why are improvements needed?

Issaquah-Pine Lake Road is a critical corridor for existing and new residential developments, multiple schools, and commercial areas. With these competing demands on the roadway, travelers experience significant delays during peak travel times.

In May 2018, the City of Sammamish began the Issaquah-Pine Lake Road Improvements Project. During the preliminary design phase, the City considered alternatives and developed a preliminary design for Issaquah-Pine Lake Road between SE 32nd Way and SE Klahanie Boulevard. The project area has since been extended to SE 44th Street as part of the 30% design.


Working with the community

Since 2018, we’ve reached out to area residents, schools, churches, businesses, community groups, and organizations to learn about their priorities for people who live, walk, bike, drive, and ride transit on Issaquah-Pine Lake Road.

In fall 2018, we elicited feedback on our preliminary design through an open house and online survey, and the input we received has impacted our 30% design.

What we've heard so far:

  • Desire to see improvements made on Issaquah-Pine Lake Road to help reduce congestion (particularly during school drop-off and pick-up times) and increase safety

  • Acknowledgement that the existing roundabout at SE 32nd Way is not working well, and broader preference for traffic signals at intersections instead of roundabouts

  • Emphasis on improving intersections and turns from and onto Issaquah-Pine Lake Road for all users

  • Appreciation for pedestrian infrastructure proposed in preliminary design, including improved sidewalks and crosswalks

  • Support for bike lanes as proposed in preliminary design

  • Interest in seeing improvements on Issaquah-Pine Lake Road outside the project area as well, especially from SE Klahanie Blvd to Issaquah-Fall City Road


What improvements are proposed?

We’re proposing improvements in our 30% design that incorporate feedback we've heard and help achieve our project goals. Click here to download a PDF (33 MB) of the full 30% design, or view the video below for a simulation of the proposed improvements.

Project goalsWhat we've incorporated in the design
Create a multimodal roadway for people who walk, drive, bike, and ride public transit
  • Maintaining one travel lane in either direction from SE 32nd Way to SE Klahanie Blvd
  • Maintaining two travel lanes in either direction from SE Klahanie Blvd to SE 44th St
  • Adding a bike lane in each direction and sidewalks where needed
Improve intersection performance
  • Replacing the roundabout at SE 32nd Way with a traffic signal
  • Adding a traffic signal at SE 37th Place
  • Adding right-turn pockets and left-turn lanes where necessary, for a total of 3 lanes between SE 32nd Way and SE Klahanie Blvd, and 5 lanes between SE Klahanie Blvd and SE 44th St
Improve safety for all users
  • Adding a landscaped buffer to separate sidewalks from roadway
  • Installing a new signal with crosswalk at SE 37th Pl for pedestrians crossing to the bus stop
  • Increasing roadway lighting
  • Building a raised landscaped center median at select areas of the corridor
Incorporate water quality upgrades
  • Creating flow-control and water quality improvements within Laughing Jacobs Basin
  • Adding fish-passable culverts at Laughing Jacobs Creek and Stream C




Next steps

The Issaquah-Pine Lake Road Improvements project is currently at the 30% design phase. Between December 2019 and February 2020, we shared the 30% design with the public through interviews with key stakeholders, an online survey, and a community meeting held on the corridor. We're currently reviewing the feedback we've received.

The City will continue to ask the community for feedback throughout the project design, and the input collected will influence the options carried forward. Once the design is finalized and the nearby Issaquah-Fall City Road project has completed construction, the City will acquire necessary right of way and begin construction.

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  • Share on Facebook Share on Twitter Share on Linkedin Email this link

    Does your traffic projection/analysis take into account how many people U turn at 32nd roundabout to go back up into Sunny Hills Elementary? The lights will need to give a priority to these people coming down the hill from PLMS, otherwise they will never be able to U-turn given the quantity of traffic coming up from Fall-City Road all the time. Most traffic projections will assume there is a left turn into the school, when cars arrive at their destination, but you cannot here and it would be unsafe to change that. The roundabout keeps all parents moving during drop off and pick up.

    Schoolmom asked 5 months ago

    Yes, our traffic modeling did take into account the U-turns that occur at the SE 32nd Street roundabout.  When we collected our traffic counts, we counted 35 vehicles making the U-turn in the morning peak hour (presumably those would be the parents dropping students off at the elementary school), and 10 vehicles making the U-turn in the evening peak hour. The signal timing that we are designing the intersection for assumes that the southbound U-turn movement would be a protected movement.


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    Have you considered a combination walking/bidirectional bike path on one side of the road or other? This would be more friendly for young children and families and would enable safe cycling to schools (Sunny Hills, PLMS, and the new school near the Klahanie entrance). In addition, if extended to Fall City Road, this would connect with the existing path that leads to the Issaquah Highlands. Finally, if traffic speeds are slow enough, bike lanes in the roadway would only be needed on the uphill sides of the road. Slower cyclists could use the walking-bike path. Faster cyclists would use uphill bike lane or merge with auto traffic on the downhills.

    Jim Laudolff asked 6 months ago

    Other areas of the City are planned to include shared use paths, but this road has not been planned to include them.

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    Does the City have any plans to incorporate the same improvements till the intersection of Issaquah - Fall City Road? The options to walk / bike along the stretch between SE. Klahanie Blvd and Issaquah - Fall City Road is very slim and pretty dangerous with the flow of traffic.

    Kaushik asked 6 months ago

    Yes, the City doe have plans to extend these improvements to the intersection of Iss-Fall City Road as part of Phase 2 corridor improvement. Improvements between that intersection and SE 48th Street will require coordination with the City of Issaquah as it is within its jurisdiction.

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    There is currently MAJOR work being done on Iss-Fall City Rd, with a road closure planned for Spring to Fall 2020 that will significantly affect Klahanie residents. Iss-Pine Lake road will be the "thoroughfare" during that time, which will increase traffic on Iss-Pine Lake road in a big way. SO - My question is - when is this road work to begin? I would also think that we all will need a traffic break after Fall City road work is completed. I suggest delaying this project for a couple of years.

    that asked 6 months ago

    Yes, construction on this road is planned for 2024, after Iss-Fall City Road is completed.

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    Are there plans to improve the section of Issaquah Pine right before Issaquah Fall City Rd? As a bike commuter, the north bound shoulder is eroding and narrow is sections, right as cars are merging down to one lane, too.

    Nsmaassel asked 6 months ago

    The City has plans to improve this section of the Issaquah-Pine Lake Road corridor as part of a future second phase of the corridor development, including bike lanes, to the Issaquah-Fall City Road intersection. Currently, this section with the merge immediately north of the intersection is within the City of Issaquah.  Any future work in this area will require coordination with the City of Issaquah.


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    What will be the auto traffic speed limit along this stretch of road?

    Jim Laudolff asked 6 months ago

    The posted speed limit will remain 35 mph.

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    Can you provide evidence that a traffic signal would perform better than the roundabout for all users including bikes and pedestrians? I have seen no problems with the roundabout that I don't see with traffic lights. In fact the traffic lights in Sammamish tend to several penalize pedestrians by not allowing crossing on all four corners and having extremely long signal times. Removing the roundabout is a waste of money.

    James Laudolff asked 6 months ago

    Our analysis shows that the existing roundabout will not be able to accommodate the increased traffic that is projected by 2035 and ensure the adopted level of service will be met. Our traffic simulation demonstrates that a traffic signal here will perform better than the existing roundabout.  The roundabout cannot be widened to accommodate future traffic projections in this location due to the limited availability of City owned Right of Way. A video of the traffic simulation will be shown at the upcoming Community Meeting (7pm, January 22nd at Pine Lake Middle School) where we intend to show how the signal will improve traffic operations. Another advantage of a traffic signal is that they are generally easier and safer for school crossing guards to assist with pedestrian traffic. The signalized intersection design accommodates bicycle traffic in designated bike lanes. To navigate a roundabout, bicyclists either navigate in the vehicular lane, or must use the pedestrian facilities.