City of Sammamish COVID-19 Information & Resources

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Please note that King County Public Health should remain your primary source of information on the COVID-19 (coronavirus) outbreak. Please check out their COVID-19 Data Dashboards for the latest statistics. To see recent news on this page, click here.

For the latest Washington State-level COVID-19 health guidance, statistics and resources, visit Coronavirus.wa.gov.

What is COVID-19?

COVID-19 (formerly known as the “novel coronavirus”) is a new virus strain spreading from person-to-person.

How does COVID-19 spread?

  • Through respiratory droplets when an infected person coughs or sneezes
  • Between people who are in close contact with one another (within about 6 feet)
  • By touching

Please note that King County Public Health should remain your primary source of information on the COVID-19 (coronavirus) outbreak. Please check out their COVID-19 Data Dashboards for the latest statistics. To see recent news on this page, click here.

For the latest Washington State-level COVID-19 health guidance, statistics and resources, visit Coronavirus.wa.gov.

What is COVID-19?

COVID-19 (formerly known as the “novel coronavirus”) is a new virus strain spreading from person-to-person.

How does COVID-19 spread?

  • Through respiratory droplets when an infected person coughs or sneezes
  • Between people who are in close contact with one another (within about 6 feet)
  • By touching a surface or object with the virus and then touching the mouth, nose, or eyes

What are the symptoms?

People who have been diagnosed with novel coronavirus have reported symptoms that may appear in as few as 2 days or as long as 14 days after exposure to the virus. Those symptoms include fever, cough, shortness of breath, and/or difficulty breathing.

Who is most vulnerable?

People at higher risk include those:

  • Over 60 years of age
  • With underlying health conditions including include heart disease, asthma or other lung disease, or diabetes
  • With weakened immune systems
  • Who are pregnant

Anyone who has questions about whether their condition puts them at risk for severe COVID-19 illness should consult with their healthcare providers. Be sure to call your provider before going to the office in person.

What is the City of Sammamish doing?

On March 3rd, the City of Sammamish activated its Emergency Operations Center (EOC) in response to the coronavirus outbreak and formed an internal COVID-19 Task Force. The operational objectives of the City were to:

  • Adopt and widely promote the below Non-Pharmaceutical Intervention recommendations (NPIs) from the WA State Public Health Agency; and
  • Update Continuity of Government/Operations Plan for pandemic response to ensure continuity of all essential government functions while protecting the health and welfare of City personnel; and
  • Provide clear public information that directs to or is consistent with State and Local Public Health messaging regarding the outbreak and protective actions.

On March 5, the City of Sammamish issued a proclamation of local emergency in order to support measures to be taken to protect public health, safety and welfare within the City. This declaration was approved by City Council at their March 10 meeting. The full proclamation is available here, and the press release can be found here.

The City of Sammamish Emergency Manager continues to participate in daily conference calls with the King County Office of Emergency Management, Public Health - Seattle & King County, jurisdictions from across the region, and community stakeholders, to facilitate the regional coordination of information and resources.

COVID-19 is an active situation that changes daily. The City of Sammamish is proactively working to mitigate the impacts from COVID-19 on our community. This portal will continually be updated to provide up-to-date information and resources to assist you through the coronavirus outbreak.

  • Emergency Manager's Report to City Council on COVID-19 (September 15, 2020)

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    Andrew Stevens, CEM - Emergency Manager -Eastside Fire & Rescue

    Good evening Mayor, Councilmembers, and City Manager.

    Thank you again for allowing me another opportunity to provide a brief situational update on COVID-19 and other current hazards facing the City. We are in the middle of Emergency Preparedness Month so tonight I will also touch on the impending flu season, the impact of wildfire smoke on Sammamish, and the concerns of residents on evacuation routes and preparedness for wildfires in light of the historic wildfires across the western states. It’s important that our city’s resiliency continue to strengthen through the challenges we face and I want the community to know we are paying close attention, are working hard for them, and we hear their concerns.

    First, I must start by addressing COVID-19, the pandemic which has taken nearly 200,000 American lives in under seven months. I sadly report that Sammamish has lost another life to COVID. Each life lost is heartbreaking especially for their loved ones. We have also seen 25 new positive cases in the last 14 days. The better news is that the total cases in the city and county appear to be trending downward again. I believe it is because we have taken clear, firm, and measurable action to preserve the wellness of our residents that we have been able to keep our numbers relatively low compared to other cities but, in order for us to maintain the low numbers of the downward trend, we must stay vigilant. The risk of falling prey to compassion fatigue will undoubtedly result in more positive cases and more lives lost.

    Just because we occasionally hit low case numbers does not mean we can relax health and safety protocols as a City government or as community members. We must turn the low trends into stable factors in the data which takes continued commitment to social distancing, wearing PPE, limiting outings and social interaction, and so forth. I urge residents to keep others in mind when deciding to downgrade their personal and family safety measures. Thank you to all complying community members who are making the health and safety or themselves and our community a top priority. Your dedication is quite literally a matter of life and death.

    This brings me to flu season and weather changes which could both impact the community especially as far as COVID-19 is concerned. If you can get a flu shot, it’s time to book your appointments. While influenza and COVID-19 are distinct illnesses with COVID-19 being far deadlier, having more unpredictable symptoms, and sometimes, a very prolonged recovery; they both create systemic vulnerabilities to humans and our community. Ultimately, we want to avoid outbreaks of both in our community, especially of co-infections. And although inclement weather may drive you inside, we continue to encourage the community to follow the social distancing guidelines set forth by public health experts and refrain from indoor socializing, especially in groups.

    Secondly, I’d like to address the smoke surge we’re collectively experiencing throughout most of the state and the west coast of America. These conditions are dangerous. Please heed all recommendations to stay indoors. If you must be outdoors, wearing your masks is helpful in this public health incident as well. Should driving become precarious, use your hazards until you get to a safe spot to pull over. While rain will eventually come and be a reprieve to our forests and wildlife, it will not clean out our air. Atmospheric movement is what is needed to clear our air and that is not expected until later in the week, although the meteorological modeling changes rapidly. Please do not assume the moment you see blue skies that the air is safe. Follow the city and county updates as well as your local news for updates on air quality. If you have heart or pulmonary conditions, please take extra precautions as directed by your physician.

    Thirdly, I have heard the concerns of residents about evacuation routes and disaster preparedness and want you to know I’m listening and responding. In addition to the robust emergency preparedness guide and resources hosted on the City website, the Sammamish City Council adopted the FEMA approved King County Regional 2020 Hazard Mitigation Plan and accompanying City of Sammamish Jurisdictional Annex. That detailed plan can be reviewed in the July 21st council agenda. It outlines mitigation actions that the City is undertaking, including all hazards transportation planning which involves an evacuation route study and mapping. The few points of egress from our community could be further hindered based on the type of emergency we’re facing. This is especially concerning for the life and safety of evacuees. Know the nearest egress points in each direction from your home!

    In the interim of having this study completed, which is yet to begin until the next year’s budget is solidified, I will be creating a preliminary Evacuation Map and Evacuation Preparedness Plan for the community. Essentially with such limited routes, it’s imperative our community is truly prepared to evacuate. Providing a checklist to residents to help prepare them is a crucial part of having effective evacuations in disasters. I will be coordinating with my boss at Eastside Fire and Rescue as well as City staff to have this approved and disseminated to the public as soon as possible on social media, in the email newsletter, and in the mailed newsletter, at minimum.

    The dense smoke is also a harsh reminder of the ever-increasing risk of wildfire across the State and even in Western WA. This is one of the reasons why I recently wrote a grant pursuing federal funding to support the development of Community Wildfire Protection Plans across all of Eastside Fire & Rescue’s service areas. The plans will be crucial in developing a strategy for how we manage the growing risk of wildfires in the wildland-urban interface of the region and how we educate our residents and implement mitigating actions that reduce risk and future vulnerability.

    Thank you all for your time and attention to these important health and safety matters. Your support is critical to my department being effective for our community. I’m now available to answer your questions if you have any.

  • Emergency Manager's Report to City Council on COVID-19 (September 1, 2020)

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    Andrew Stevens, CEM - Emergency Manager -Eastside Fire & Rescue

    Good evening Mayor, Council members, and City Manager.

    Thank you again for allowing me the opportunity to provide an update on the ongoing COVID-19 response.

    A recent situational report released by the State of Washington is showing an overall plateau and potentially slight decline in statewide COVID-19 cases, with the R factor, or the measure used to highlight how fast the virus is spreading, remaining around 1. This statewide plateau is a mixture of counties that are holding stable, such as King County, counties that are seeing increased cases, and a few, such as Yakima, which is now decreasing.

    While the statewide plateau in COVID-19 cases can be seen as a positive, it, unfortunately, means that 10-15 Washingtonians are still dying each day from the virus. If those numbers continue through the remainder of the year, then Washington will experience approximately 1,250-1,875 additional COVID-19 deaths by the end of 2020. With the over 1,900 deaths that have already occurred, this would likely make COVID-19 a top five cause of death in Washington this year.

    Sammamish has unfortunately seen additional COVID-19 fatalities since my last report. In mid-August, two more Sammamish residents died as a result of the COVID-19. These were the first COVID related deaths the City has seen since early May. This, including the uptick in positive cases we experienced over the past month, is a somber reminder that the COVID pandemic is still very much ongoing.

    Lastly, September is recognized as National Preparedness Month. I urge all Sammamish residents to visit the City’s website where they can find a host of emergency preparedness guides and resources. Just as States along the Gulf Coast are now being threatened by hurricanes while at the same time combating COVID, Sammamish is threatened by numerous hazards that could occur without notice and with devastating consequences. All residents should have a plan for what they will do in a disaster, supplies to see them through the recovery, and know how to stay informed before, during, and after an emergency. While not many could have predicted the prior and ongoing challenges associated with COVID-19, I feel that there is plenty that everyone can do to ensure that we as a community strengthen our disaster resiliency.

    Thank you.

  • Emergency Manager's Report to City Council on COVID-19 (Aug 11, 2020)

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    11 August, 2020

    Andrew Stevens, CEM - Emergency Manager -Eastside Fire & Rescue

    Good evening Mayor, Council members, and City Manager.

    Thank you again for allowing me with the opportunity to provide a brief situational update on COVID-19

    Three weeks ago, when I provided my last update to Council, COVID-19 numbers across the state, county, and in Sammamish were all on the rise. The number of positive cases across the county was meeting or exceeding previous records set in late March, before the statewide shut-down. Sammamish was also setting records for positive daily case counts during this time, hitting 10 new cases in a single day on July 20th, where the prior record was 7 cases on March 27th.

    Since then, we have begun to see numbers stabilize, but they are still not back to where they were during the complete statewide lockdown. From July 27th to August 10th there were 32 new positive cases in Sammamish, at a rate of 50.0 per 100,000 residents. Today, Sammamish is registering 196 positive cases, an increase of 5 new cases since yesterday, and roughly 10% of our population has been tested.

    King County had established key indicators of COVID-19 activity, assessing trends in both virus spread, testing capability, and healthcare system readiness to determine overall risk. Currently, the county is not meeting the target goals for ½ of those indicators. Most notably, to meet the goal set for the total number of cases for the last 14 days per 100,000 residents, the county would be under 25 per 100k. King County is currently sitting at 91 and as I mentioned above Sammamish is sitting at 50.

    Given these increases, not just in WA but across the nation, where now over five million people have contracted the disease and over 165,000 people have died, it is extremely important for everyone to do their part in slowing this virus. We are seeing more and more cases of small family gatherings ending in transmission across households. We are seeing more and more cases of young, asymptomatic people infecting older more vulnerable family members, colleagues, or friends. I still see parents turning a blind eye or willfully participating in ignoring playground or park facility closures. What example is that demonstrating? At this point in this pandemic, when over 1,000 US citizens are dying each day, I am not sure what else it will take for the majority of individuals to take this crisis seriously and abide by all the public health recommendations.

    Sammamish is continuing to promote and assist our residents in doing just that. Following the success of last month’s cloth face mask distribution event where roughly 10,500 masks were provided free to residents, we have distributed another 11,000 masks, this time partnering with LWSD, ISD, and Eastside Friends of Seniors. These masks were distributed to Sammamish families through free lunch programs, through school registration packets, and home care packages delivered to our most vulnerable residents. On top of that, the City has rolled out its small business grant program, providing over $250,000 to businesses affected by COVID-19. This application period closes on August 20th and more information can be found on the City’s website.

    Lastly, I would like to thank all the residents and businesses in Sammamish who are doing their part to stop this outbreak. The majority of people I see when out in town are complying with public health recommendations. They are wearing masks, socially distancing from others, and practicing strong environmental hygiene. I understand the reality of COVID fatigue but continuing to stay the course is so very important to eventually winning this fight.

    Thank you.

  • FEMA Authorized to Use Disaster Funds to Supplement Unemployment Benefits

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    10 August, 2020

    To help ease the financial burden on those who are unemployed because of the coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic, President Trump authorized FEMA to use Stafford Act disaster relief funds to provide supplemental payments for lost wages due to the COVID-19 pandemic. Up to $44 billion in Disaster Relief Funding is available to support this initiative.

    FEMA will provide funding to states and territories that request and apply for assistance. Unemployed Americans who have lost wages because of COVID-19 may be eligible for assistance.

    On March 13, 2020, President Trump declared a national emergency concerning the novel coronavirus disease (COVID-19). Since then, all 50 states, five territories, the Seminole Tribe of Florida and the District of Columbia were approved for major disaster declarations to assist with additional needs. The new funding for lost wages is in addition to the $8.8 billion FEMA has already obligated in support of COVID-19 efforts.

    FEMA is working closely with the White House and other federal agency partners to develop guidance on the process for states and territories to easily request and receive funds. States and territories may provide eligible individuals $400 per week, with a $300 federal contribution. The states and territories will administer the program and distribute the funds through their regular unemployment insurance system, as a supplemental payment.

    This program will be applied retroactively to the week ending August 1 and continues through no later than December 6, 2020, or until the balance of the Disaster Relief Fund reaches $25 billion, or Congress enacts a replacement unemployment relief program.

    Individuals who currently receive at least $100 per week of unemployment compensation benefits, and provide self-certification that they are unemployed, or are unable or unavailable to work due to disruptions caused by COVID-19 are eligible for the supplement through their state or territory unemployment office.

    More here: FEMA_Advisory_LostWages_final_v2a_20200809.pdf

  • Housing Stabilization Assistance for Veterans and Family Members Affected by COVID-19

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    10 August, 2020

    The King County Veterans Program has established Housing Stabilization Assistance funds for veterans, service members and their families affected by COVID-19. Please visit here for more information.


  • Commerce distributing state CARES Act funding to community agencies that will operate assistance program to pay past due rent and prevent future evictions

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    03 August, 2020
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    From the Washington State Department of Commerce:

    OLYMPIA, WA – The Washington State Department of Commerce is distributing approximately $100 million in state Coronavirus Aid, Relief and Economic Security (CARES) Act funding through its existing network of homeless services grantees and organizations serving homeless youth to operate a new rent assistance program launched Aug. 1. The program will focus on preventing evictions by paying up to three months of past due, current and future rent to landlords for eligible participants.

    “Funds addressing Washington’s homelessness crisis were limited before the pandemic, and the need is deepening as this pandemic continues to push more people toward the brink while we work to carefully reopen our economy,” said Commerce Director Lisa Brown. “We are targeting limited resources as quickly and equitably as possible, to those with the greatest needs.”

    This rent assistance program will address some of the need resulting from the coronavirus pandemic, and hopes to reduce some of the stress both renters and landlords are facing now and in the future. Rent assistance is limited to three months and the program ends Dec. 31, 2020.

    A survey recently showed 17% of renters in Washington state missed their July rent payment. Since February, state’s employment has declined 12% – over twice that of the worst point in the Great Recession – and use of basic food assistance programs has increased by 15%.

    Commerce provided guidance and formula-based grant amounts to its Consolidated Homeless Grant program lead grantees and organizations serving the Office of Homeless Youth in every county of the state. These organizations will use grant funds to provide up to three months of rent assistance that will be paid to landlords on an eligible client’s behalf. Complete program information is on the Commerce web page.

    Equity is a primary program goal, with a focus on groups of people who historically have not been provided equitable access to rent assistance and those who have been disproportionately impacted by the COVID-19 outbreak. These communities include ethnic and racial minorities, immigrants and refugees, individuals who identify as LGBTQ+, individuals with disabilities or who are deaf and Native Americans.

    Funding is expected to begin making its way into communities late this week.

  • Governor Inslee Announces Rollbacks to Some Activities to Slow COVID-19 Exposure

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    23 July, 2020
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    Governor Jay Inslee and Secretary of Health John Wiesman today announced changes to “Safe Start,” Washington’s phased approach to reopening. The changes target activities that data have shown provide a higher risk of COVID-19 exposure.

    It has been four months since the governor announced the state’s “Stay Home, Stay Healthy” order. Since then, cases in Washington have risen from 2,000 to almost 50,000, and deaths have increased from 110 to nearly 1,500.

    To combat the rising numbers, the governor and secretary are changing guidance and regulations around restaurants, bars, and fitness centers, as well as weddings and funerals. The changes will also affect family entertainment centers, movie theaters and card rooms.

    “We do not take these steps lightly. We know every prohibition is a challenge for individuals and business owners,” Inslee said during a press conference Thursday. “But we know that if we fail to act, we expose people and businesses to even greater risk down the line.”

    Read the rest of the story on the governor's Medium page.

  • New Park Rule Requires Residents to Follow Posted Signage at City Parks

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    23 July, 2020
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    On July 21st, the Sammamish City Council adopted an ordinance requiring all park users to follow posted signage at City parks. The new park rule includes any and all signs communicating COVID-19 restrictions established by the Governor’s phased reopening plan. As part of Phase 2 guidelines, outdoor recreation is restricted to five or fewer people outside a household and is part of the Governor’s data-driven approach to reopen Washington and encourage social distancing measures while minimizing the health impacts of COVID-19. Despite the Governor’s physical distancing orders, the Sammamish City Council; the Sammamish Police Department; the Parks, Recreation, and Facilities Department; and the Sammamish community have observed park users gathering in large groups well beyond the Governor’s guidelines, which threatens the preservation of the public health, safety, and general welfare of the community. Violation of posted signage in a City park may now include a fine up to $500.

  • Sammamish Emergency Manager's July 21 Report to City Council on COVID-19

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    22 July, 2020
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    This is the complete text of the report that was delivered live to City Council at their Regular Meeting the evening of Tuesday, July 21, 2020.

    Andrew Stevens, CEM - Emergency Manager, Eastside Fire & Rescue

    Good evening Mayor, Council members, and City Manager.

    Thank you again for allowing me with the opportunity to provide a brief situational update on COVID-19

    In the past two weeks, the global coronavirus case count has risen by roughly 3 million, with the United States’ total positive count increasing to nearly 4 million cases. Two weeks ago, I reported that the majority of states across the nation were again experiencing rapid increases in case counts, hospitalizations, and fatalities. That unfortunately still holds true today, even in Washington.

    A recent statewide situation report published by the Washington State Department of Health outlined a grim reality, highlighting the alarming trends statewide in both COVID-19 transmission rates and hospitalization data. Currently, most areas of the state are at extreme risk of negating all the gains made during the past several months of lockdown. Daily case counts are surpassing any of the State’s previous peaks from back in March. The greatest increases in positive cases are tied to the younger population, especially among the 20-29 year-old age group, highlighting the fact that these increases are more tied to social and workplace exposures than any other factor.

    Sammamish is also seeing an increase in cases. We are currently sitting at 152 positive cases, with an increase of 9 new cases from yesterday. That is the single highest daily new case total for the City since the outbreak began. There have been multiple other days in July with new daily case counts of 4 or 5. To put that in context, the daily counts for Sammamish were averaging around 1 or 2, with numerous days showing no new cases through most of April, May, and June. By most metrics, everything is looking worse. The Washington Department of Health stated that we are in the early stages of an exponential statewide outbreak that would have zero chances of being reversed without widespread changes in behavior and policy. One could assume that we will begin to see rollbacks in the State’s phased reopening plan soon.


    In previous City Council meetings, I have been asked questions during my report which, if I could not provide an answer to then, responded to Council via email following the meeting. I would like to address some of those question now for the public. Two weeks ago, Councilmember Stuart asked a question concerning the enforcement of statewide orders related to COVID-19, such as the mandatory wearing of face coverings. Yes, the orders are enforceable by law under RCW 43.06.220(5). However, as stated by the governor himself, he would prefer that compliance with these orders be done through persuasion and not prosecution. The Council could mandate that Sammamish PD strongly pursue and cite those not complying with these orders, but we would most likely be the only jurisdiction in the state doing so. To complicate the issue, exemptions in the governor's order for reasons why individuals may not be required to wear a mask or comply with any other section of the order, would make it nearly impossible for an officer to prove otherwise in the field.

    A question regarding Sammamish PD’s and Eastside Fire & Rescue's use of PPE was also asked. Both PD, EFR, and City staff are required to comply with the statewide face covering mandate and have all developed the internal polices and directives requiring all employees to do so.

    Lastly, due to the success of this month’s earlier mask distribution event, Sammamish has requested an additional 16,000 masks from King County and a plan to again provide the free cloth face coverings to the public will be announced soon.

    Thank you.

  • Bloodworks Pop-Up Donation Center in Sammamish July 21-31

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    20 July, 2020
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    Donate at the Bloodworks Northwest Pop-Up Donor Center at Sammamish Presbyterian Church

    A message from Bloodworks Northwest:

    From July 21st through 31st Sammamish Presbyterian Church will be hosting a new Pop-Up Donor Center, providing donors a convenient, local location to donate blood. July is generally one of the lowest months for blood donation, and COVID-19 has placed increased strain on the blood supply at local hospitals.

    The governors of both Washington and Oregon recognize the crucial role that Bloodworks donors fill in sustaining community health, so leaving home to donate blood is a crucial and safe activity exempt from both states’ stay-at-home orders. Local, state, and national leaders are unanimous – donating blood remains a critical and safe activity for community health.

    “During the height of the COVID-19 pandemic, many surgeries were cancelled or postponed and the healthcare system is now working hard to catch up,” said Dr. Eileen Bulger, Harborview Trauma Surgeon. “In addition, emergency surgery for serious injuries can’t be postponed and the summer season is the busiest time for our Level 1 Trauma center at Harborview Medical Center. We rely on blood donors and Bloodworks Northwest to ensure that we have the life-saving blood products needed at this critical time.”

    All donations at this Pop-Up Donor Center and our other Donor Centers are by appointment only to provide the safest donation environment and adhere to all social distancing guidelines. Additionally, no walk-ins, guests, or people under age 16 are permitted onsite. Masks are required by all donors and staff. Your one-hour donation appointment is a safe and essential action to support local hospitals.


    Sammamish Pop-Up Donor Center

    Sammamish Presbyterian Church

    July 21st through 31st

    22522 NE Inglewood Hill Road

    Sammamish, WA 98074

    Appointments are required and can be made here or calling 1-800-398-7888

    Due to the increased need for donations, all donors in July will be automatically entered into the Pump It Up Sweepstakes for a chance to win a Peloton Bike.

    Have a question? Email us. For more information regarding blood donation during COVID-19, visit bloodworksnw.org/coronavirus.