COVID-19 Information & Resources

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Please note that King County Public Health should remain your primary source of information on the COVID-19 (coronavirus) outbreak. Please check out their COVID-19 Data Dashboards for the latest statistics. To see recent news on this page, click here.

For the latest Washington State-level COVID-19 health guidance, statistics and resources, visit Coronavirus.wa.gov.

What is COVID-19?

COVID-19 (formerly known as the “novel coronavirus”) is a new virus strain spreading from person-to-person.

How does COVID-19 spread?

  • Through respiratory droplets when an infected person coughs or sneezes
  • Between people who are in close contact with one another (within about 6 feet)
  • By touching

Please note that King County Public Health should remain your primary source of information on the COVID-19 (coronavirus) outbreak. Please check out their COVID-19 Data Dashboards for the latest statistics. To see recent news on this page, click here.

For the latest Washington State-level COVID-19 health guidance, statistics and resources, visit Coronavirus.wa.gov.

What is COVID-19?

COVID-19 (formerly known as the “novel coronavirus”) is a new virus strain spreading from person-to-person.

How does COVID-19 spread?

  • Through respiratory droplets when an infected person coughs or sneezes
  • Between people who are in close contact with one another (within about 6 feet)
  • By touching a surface or object with the virus and then touching the mouth, nose, or eyes

What are the symptoms?

People who have been diagnosed with novel coronavirus have reported symptoms that may appear in as few as 2 days or as long as 14 days after exposure to the virus. Those symptoms include fever, cough, shortness of breath, and/or difficulty breathing.

Who is most vulnerable?

People at higher risk include those:

  • Over 60 years of age
  • With underlying health conditions including include heart disease, asthma or other lung disease, or diabetes
  • With weakened immune systems
  • Who are pregnant

Anyone who has questions about whether their condition puts them at risk for severe COVID-19 illness should consult with their healthcare providers. Be sure to call your provider before going to the office in person.

What is the City of Sammamish doing?

On March 3rd, the City of Sammamish activated its Emergency Operations Center (EOC) in response to the coronavirus outbreak and formed an internal COVID-19 Task Force. The operational objectives of the City were to:

  • Adopt and widely promote the below Non-Pharmaceutical Intervention recommendations (NPIs) from the WA State Public Health Agency; and
  • Update Continuity of Government/Operations Plan for pandemic response to ensure continuity of all essential government functions while protecting the health and welfare of City personnel; and
  • Provide clear public information that directs to or is consistent with State and Local Public Health messaging regarding the outbreak and protective actions.

On March 5, the City of Sammamish issued a proclamation of local emergency in order to support measures to be taken to protect public health, safety and welfare within the City. This declaration was approved by City Council at their March 10 meeting. The full proclamation is available here, and the press release can be found here.

The City of Sammamish Emergency Manager continues to participate in daily conference calls with the King County Office of Emergency Management, Public Health - Seattle & King County, jurisdictions from across the region, and community stakeholders, to facilitate the regional coordination of information and resources.

COVID-19 is an active situation that changes daily. The City of Sammamish is proactively working to mitigate the impacts from COVID-19 on our community. This portal will continually be updated to provide up-to-date information and resources to assist you through the coronavirus outbreak.

  • PSE Offering Bill Assistance for Customers Affected by COVID-19

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    Puget Sound Energy will make $11 million available to help customers pay bills.


    Puget Sound Energy will make funds available to help customers who have been impacted by the COVID-19 pandemic through its Crisis-Affected Customer Assistance Program (CACAP).This includes customers who recently became unemployed, partially unemployed, or cannot work.The $11 million are carry-over funds under PSE’s Low Income Program. With approval from the Washington Utilities and Transportation Commission, PSE made revisions to its program to make these funds available to a broader group of customers.


    Funds are also available in PSE’s other assistance programs, including the Warm Home Fund, PSE Home Energy Lifeline Program, and Weatherization Assistance Program for income-eligible customers.


    “We know this pandemic is deeply affecting many of our customers, and we have been working since its start to ensure no one is without electricity, heat, or hot water during this time,” said PSE President and CEO Mary Kipp. “We are in unprecedented times, and it will take continued partnership and creativity to help as many people as possible.”

    This program will be available to PSE’s residential customers in King County and other areas who meet the household size and income criteria.

    Depending on average monthly usage, a qualified PSE customer:

    • Must have a monthly household income limit up to 250% of Federal Poverty Level
    • Can receive up to $1,000 in PSE utility-bill credits per household

    This table outlines the monthly household income limits at the Federal Poverty Level for households up to 10 people.

    PSE continues to offer payment plans and allow customers to change bill’s due date for those who may need additional assistance.

    For more information on this program and other program offerings, visit www.pse.com/covidhelp.

  • New Emergency Feeding Program from Issaquah Food & Clothing Bank

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    Issaquah Food & Clothing Bank has rolled out a new Emergency Feeding Program that will deliver to any Sammamish resident in need. Traditionally, this agency has served only the south end of our city, with our partners at Hopelink providing services on the north end. However, for the duration of the COVID-19 emergency, Issaquah Food & Clothing Bank has very kindly agreed to deliver to all of Sammamish’s residents requiring services. Please note that this offer of citywide service applies only the Emergency Delivery Program. Get started here.

    Issaquah Food & Clothing Bank will consider the following questions in determining if your household qualifies for delivery:

    Transportation: Do you have transportation to and from the Food Bank? If so, you should utilize their pick-up model. If not, you may qualify.

    Health: Do you have a serious health condition that makes it hard for you to get to the Food Bank?

    Employment schedule: Are you part of an essential service employment team and are unable to make it to the food bank during our regular distribution hours?

    Live in our Food Bank service area: The Food Bank serves the following zip codes: 98027, 98029, 98075 and 98059. For this temporary food delivery, we will also be serving those living in the 98074 zip code.

    If you meet the criteria above, you may be eligible for temporary delivery service. Please contact Erin at erin@issaquahfoodbank.org or 425-392-4123 ext. 16 to learn more.

  • Need help making rent? A new program from United Way of King County may help.

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    If you’re a King County resident who has been impacted financially by COVID-19 and are behind on your rent, you may qualify for assistance. Visit https://www.uwkc.org/renthelp/ to learn more and to apply.

  • Sammamish Emergency Manager's 4/7 Report to City Council on COVID-19

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    This report was provided live to our City Council at their regular meeting on April 7, 2020.

    Report to Sammamish City Council on COVID-19

    Andrew Stevens, CEM – Emergency Manager - Eastside Fire & Rescue

    Good evening, Mayor and Council members. Two weeks ago, the global number of confirmed Coronavirus cases was just over 400,000. Today, that number has risen by over one million. At just under 390,000, the United States leads the world in positive cases, a number nearly three times larger than the next highest county. As of today, the total number of confirmed COVID-19 cases in King County is 3,462, however recent studies have shown that Stay Home, Stay Healthy order has begun to slow the spread of the virus in the State. Looking at the metrics across King County, it appears Sammamish residents have been doing their part in fighting this outbreak. Out of 39 cities in King County, only 3 have fewer number of cases per 100,000 residents. While this number may not be entirely accurate, it is still a notable accomplishment. [Resource: King County COVID-19 Data Dashboard.]

    However, this outbreak is far from over. While we should all be encouraged by some of the statistics coming out of WA State and King County, this fight will continue for many more months and we may very well see multiple spikes in cases. This is not a virus than can be contained locally, as evident by the global numbers, but must be fought with a concentrated, unified effort. While Washington has been limiting gatherings for over a month and issued a Stay at Home order more than two weeks ago, there are still nine states with no such mitigation measures in place. I urge all Sammamish residents not to be lulled into a false sense of complacency, as everyone needs to remain vigilant in this effort.

    Understanding the massive economic, psychological, and emotional toll this response is having on our community, the city has been progressively leaning forward to assess and identify ways in which we may be able to support the various non-profit, human-services, and faith-based organizations, which are all essential to the long-term recovery of our community. The City has distributed a survey to all these community stakeholders to gather information on their current capabilities, their needs, and their ability to scale up services to greater number of residents if needed. Furthermore, the City’s Human Services Coordinator is in constant contact with these organizations, is providing weekly situational reports to the EOC, and participating in semi-weekly meetings with colleagues from other Eastside Cities. The City is also continually updating the Connect Sammamish COVID-19 resource hub with new information on programs established in the County, which may support residents in need of assistance.

    On the economic front, the city is continuing to promote and share small business resources, such as the low-interest loans available through the Small Business Administration, resources from the WA Employment Security Department, and unemployment resources for individuals. We are also looking at ways which we can support local businesses, such as collaborating with the Chamber of Commerce to aid small businesses throughout the city.

    City government is continuing to function with only a slight reduction in organizational capability. Due to the early implementation of robust COVID-19 mitigations and social distancing policies, and ingenuity of City staff, we can proudly say that the City has been able to ensure the continuity of all mission essential functions without a single instance of workplace contraction of COVID-19.

    Lastly, in times of stress, and what may seem like an unending cycle of bad news, it is important to share stories of hope and resiliency. Sammamish residents have continually stepped up in support of one another throughout this crisis. Whether working on the front lines in a hospital, sewing or 3D printing masks and respirators, or picking up groceries for a vulnerable neighbor, the community is standing together. Therefore, I am asking residents to share these stories of community resiliency on our Connect.Sammamish COVID-19 web page. We do not want the hardships we are facing to define this moment, but instead, how our community has come together to support each other when it was most needed.

    Thank you.

  • Governor Inslee Announces Washington Food Fund

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    Today Governor Inslee announced the launch of WA Food Fund to ensure every Washingtonian can put food on the table during this crisis. This resource will provide to Sammamish residents in need, and it also accepts donations from residents wishing to help families in the community.

    Watch the announcement video from Governor Inslee:


  • Governor extends school closures for the rest of the 2019-20 school year

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    Governor Jay Inslee and Superintendent of Public Instruction Chris Reykdal today announced the extension of school closures for the remainder of the 2019-2020 school year. The order keeps both public and private schools closed in accordance with the governor's original order on March 13.

    The governor's proclamation prohibits in-person instruction through June 19, with exceptions for students with disabilities and English language learners for whom distance learning would present challenges. Facilities remain accessible for limited use, including providing child care and packing take-home meals for students' families to pick up. All activities must follow Department of Health social distancing guidelines.

    "This closure is guided by science and is our greatest opportunity to keep our kids, educators and communities safe," Inslee said at a news conference Monday afternoon. "If there is any opportunity to bring students back for a few days, including graduation ceremonies for our seniors, we will continue to explore that option. That opportunity will be guided by our collective behavior and the success we can achieve with the choices we make today."

    Inslee said students' grades will not suffer as a result of the closure and encouraged them to take advantage of remaining learning opportunities. The governor also asked teachers and administrators to work together on the best path forward for the remainder of the school year.

    “There is no question about it: Our educators and school staff are absolutely dedicated to continuing to provide supports for students and their learning,” Reykdal said. “We have already seen districts step up to provide meals for students in need and child care for the children of essential workers. Over the past three weeks, they have prepared for and begun providing continuous learning for students – and this will only get better and more sophisticated over time. We will continue serving our students and we will persevere through this.”

    Read the proclamation here.

  • King County Publishes New Emergency Food Access Resource

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    Public Health - Seattle & King County has created a new page containing information about food access programs and services to help support King County residents during this difficult time. Categories include General food resources; Food delivery resources; Food pick-up resources; Older adults and people with disabilities; Pregnant people, new moms and children under age 5; Children; People without shelter or who have low incomes (including teens); For U.S. citizens and legal immigrants; and State and federal resources.

  • Governor Inslee extends 'Stay Home, Stay Healthy' order through May 4

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    Governor Jay Inslee announced a month-long extension of his "Stay Home, Stay Healthy" emergency order Thursday evening. The order, which banned all gatherings and temporarily shuttered non-essential businesses, will continue through May 4.

    "Epidemiological modeling from the University of Washington predicts we will have at least 1,400 deaths this year," Inslee said. "We are yet to see the full toll of this virus in our state and the modeling we’ve seen could be much worse if we don’t continue what we’re doing to slow the spread."

    Public gatherings remain banned and non-essential businesses may reopen May 5.

    Read the full press release on the Washington Governor's web page and learn more on the Governor's Medium page.

  • Mask Use in the General Population

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    Should everyone in the general public be wearing masks?

    Staying apart from other people is our best protection against COVID-19, but non-medical masks can be a supplement. Before deciding to wear a mask, Public Health recommends people keep two considerations central:

    Medical masks should be reserved for healthcare providers who are on the front lines working to protect us all. We have had shortages of those masks and it’s critically important that our healthcare workers have the equipment they need to do their jobs.

    Non-medical mask use (e.g., homemade fabric masks) does not replace the need to follow guidance to stay home and limit our contact with others. It does not replace frequent hand-washing, avoiding touching the face, and staying away from people who are ill. These are the most important steps to prevent the spread of COVID-19 illness.

    How might homemade cloth mask use in the general public help slow the spread of COVID-19?

    Wearing a fabric mask can help prevent the spread of infection to others when the mask is worn by someone who already is infected with the virus that causes COVID-19, even if they don’t have symptoms. The mask will block infectious droplets from spreading when someone with the infection coughs, sneezes and, to a lesser degree, speaks.

    To be effective, masks should be worn consistently and properly so as not to contaminate the hands or face of the user, and fabric masks should be changed when moist and washed after use. Masks that have been worn may be contaminated with infectious agents.

    What about if I make my own masks or repurpose things around the house like bandanas?

    Well-designed homemade or commercially manufactured masks for the public that do not draw on the supply needed by health care workers may provide some benefit, although that is uncertain. It is important for homemade or other masks to be well made, fit well, and be properly cleaned or sanitized.

    To be most effective, masks should be worn consistently and properly so as not to contaminate the hands or face of the user, and fabric masks should be changed when moist and washed after use.

    Most importantly, mask use should not make people less likely to take more important steps to prevent COVID-19 infection like staying home and avoiding all non-essential activities and contact with others, frequent hand-washing, and not touching the face (eyes, nose and mouth).

    What if I am caring for a loved one that is symptomatic?

    If you are caring for a loved one with a respiratory infection, you and your loved one should both wear masks when you are in close contact. If only one mask is available, give it to the person who is ill to wear.

    If no masks are available, help your loved one cover their cough when you are in the room. For instance, ask your loved one to cover their cough with a bandana, a sheet, or a blanket. These will not stop the spread of viral particles but may limit the distance of spread.

    People who are interested in more information on alternative personal protective equipment (PPE) can look to the WA Department of Health’s Guidance for Caregivers. It is still unclear how effective these strategies are and whether there is any potential risk of using alternatives to traditional PPE.


  • Governor offers new reporting tool and enforcement guidance for "Stay Home, Stay Healthy"

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    Gov. Jay Inslee announced guidance Monday for state and local enforcement of his recent “Stay Home, Stay Healthy” order. The state has created a one-stop online form for reporting businesses potentially violating orders and is providing guidance to local law enforcement on enforcing bans on gatherings of individuals.

    “Since I announced the ‘Stay Home, Stay Healthy’ order for our state, we have seen social distancing and other compliance from businesses and residents across Washington for the good of the public health,” Inslee said. “But thousands of calls are also pouring in to state and local agencies from concerned residents, with reports that some individuals and businesses are not in compliance.

    “These people are concerned about their health, the health of others, and how the actions of those who willfully violate this order may ultimately drag out the COVID-19 crisis even longer.”

    Read the full story on the governor's Medium page.

Page last updated: 16 September 2021, 16:06