COVID-19 Information & Resources

Share on Facebook Share on Twitter Share on Linkedin Email this link

Please note that King County Public Health should remain your primary source of information on the COVID-19 (coronavirus) outbreak. Please check out their COVID-19 Data Dashboards for the latest statistics. To see recent news on this page, click here.

For the latest Washington State-level COVID-19 health guidance, statistics and resources, visit Coronavirus.wa.gov.

What is COVID-19?

COVID-19 (formerly known as the “novel coronavirus”) is a new virus strain spreading from person-to-person.

How does COVID-19 spread?

  • Through respiratory droplets when an infected person coughs or sneezes
  • Between people who are in close contact with one another (within about 6 feet)
  • By touching

Please note that King County Public Health should remain your primary source of information on the COVID-19 (coronavirus) outbreak. Please check out their COVID-19 Data Dashboards for the latest statistics. To see recent news on this page, click here.

For the latest Washington State-level COVID-19 health guidance, statistics and resources, visit Coronavirus.wa.gov.

What is COVID-19?

COVID-19 (formerly known as the “novel coronavirus”) is a new virus strain spreading from person-to-person.

How does COVID-19 spread?

  • Through respiratory droplets when an infected person coughs or sneezes
  • Between people who are in close contact with one another (within about 6 feet)
  • By touching a surface or object with the virus and then touching the mouth, nose, or eyes

What are the symptoms?

People who have been diagnosed with novel coronavirus have reported symptoms that may appear in as few as 2 days or as long as 14 days after exposure to the virus. Those symptoms include fever, cough, shortness of breath, and/or difficulty breathing.

Who is most vulnerable?

People at higher risk include those:

  • Over 60 years of age
  • With underlying health conditions including include heart disease, asthma or other lung disease, or diabetes
  • With weakened immune systems
  • Who are pregnant

Anyone who has questions about whether their condition puts them at risk for severe COVID-19 illness should consult with their healthcare providers. Be sure to call your provider before going to the office in person.

What is the City of Sammamish doing?

On March 3rd, the City of Sammamish activated its Emergency Operations Center (EOC) in response to the coronavirus outbreak and formed an internal COVID-19 Task Force. The operational objectives of the City were to:

  • Adopt and widely promote the below Non-Pharmaceutical Intervention recommendations (NPIs) from the WA State Public Health Agency; and
  • Update Continuity of Government/Operations Plan for pandemic response to ensure continuity of all essential government functions while protecting the health and welfare of City personnel; and
  • Provide clear public information that directs to or is consistent with State and Local Public Health messaging regarding the outbreak and protective actions.

On March 5, the City of Sammamish issued a proclamation of local emergency in order to support measures to be taken to protect public health, safety and welfare within the City. This declaration was approved by City Council at their March 10 meeting. The full proclamation is available here, and the press release can be found here.

The City of Sammamish Emergency Manager continues to participate in daily conference calls with the King County Office of Emergency Management, Public Health - Seattle & King County, jurisdictions from across the region, and community stakeholders, to facilitate the regional coordination of information and resources.

COVID-19 is an active situation that changes daily. The City of Sammamish is proactively working to mitigate the impacts from COVID-19 on our community. This portal will continually be updated to provide up-to-date information and resources to assist you through the coronavirus outbreak.

  • New COVID19 Dashboard: Summary of COVID Vaccinations among King County Residents

    Share on Facebook Share on Twitter Share on Linkedin Email this link
    supporting image

    Curious about vaccine distribution in King County? Check out King County's new #COVID19 vaccine dashboard where you can see how many people have been vaccinated for COVID-19, their demographics, and the number of doses allocated to providers in King County.

    https://www.kingcounty.gov/depts/health/covid-19/data/vaccination.aspx

  • Emergency Manager's Report to City Council on COVID-19 (January 5, 2021)

    Share on Facebook Share on Twitter Share on Linkedin Email this link

    Andrew Stevens, CEM - Emergency Manager -Eastside Fire & Rescue

    Good evening Mayor, Council members, and City Manager.

    Across the nation, states are beginning to experience the expected surge of COVID-19 cases resulting from the holiday gatherings of late December. Even though the U.S. was leading the world in both cases and fatalities, over 18 million individuals still elected to travel, including a record 1.3 million people screened by TSA this past Sunday alone. Many states’ public health systems are being pushed to the brink of collapse, ICUs are filled beyond capacity, and ambulance services are having to wait sometimes hours before they can transfer patients. In Los Angeles, for example, the medical care systems are currently so overwhelmed that officials have instructed paramedics and EMTs to no longer transport critically injured or sick individuals to hospitals if they first cannot be resuscitated in the field.

    The U.S. is averaging over 215,000 new cases and nearly 2,700 COVID-19 deaths each day, or 1 death every 32 seconds. That means since I have begun talking 3 individuals have died from COVID-19 in America. The U.S. has seen roughly 21 million cases of COVID, or roughly 1 in every 15 Americans, and a staggering 356,000 fatalities. There are even some studies estimating that the actual number of cases in the U.S. be more than four times higher than what is being reported. Locally, King County has seen nearly 65,000 cases and Sammamish is now registering 804.

    Two vaccines to prevent Covid-19 infections have now been granted authorization for emergency use, and every day thousands more people are becoming vaccinated. The CDC is reporting that more than 4.8 million initial doses of the two Covid-19 vaccines have been administered so far, and while that is far fewer than what was expected to have been administered at this point in time, it is presumed that the number of vaccinations provided will rapidly increase as the logistical networks improve. So far, however, only 35,000 King County residents have received at least 1 dose of the COVID-19 vaccine. Given that it will most likely be well into 2021, or later until herd immunity by vaccination is achieved, I am highly supportive of staff’s decision today to cancel all large city-run events through July.

    The City’s closed its community-wide COVID-19 Impact Survey with the new year with 1454 individual responses, over half of which were a result of the informational postcards mailed to every household in the City. The results provide key insight into the needs of the community, and how the City Council may elect to address those needs through additional funding or support. Here are a few important takeaways:

    • 6.4% of respondents were recently unemployed due to COVID – some of who left their jobs to assist their families at home.
    • 3% of respondents claim to be experiencing extreme financial stress
    • 48 respondents were very concerned about their continued ability to pay for housing
    • 113 respondents were very concerned with their continuity of employment
    • Nearly 600 respondents were either very concerned or somewhat concerned about access to mental health services.

    The results of the survey highlight what we may have expected, that although the majority of the City’s residents appear to be weathering the COVID-19 storm, there most definitely are portions of the population in need of continued assistance. While the federal government finally approved additional assistance to both individuals and businesses, and additional State programs have been rolled out or extended, there are most likely gaps where the City government can step up to fill.

    Regarding CARES Act funding that was specifically earmarked for COVID-19 response and recovery expenses, the City has spent roughly $1.9 million of the $2.9 million that was reimbursed to the City. That includes roughly $155K on emergency protective measures and internal COVID-19 expenses, $215K on I.T. expenses necessary to ensure continuity of government, $1,211,000 in two rounds of small business and non-profit grants, and $315K to support human service organizations assisting those impacted. A full breakdown of those expenses was provided to Council earlier today.

    With that, I would be happy to address any questions you may have. Thank you.

  • Washington's COVID-19 Vaccine Phases

    Share on Facebook Share on Twitter Share on Linkedin Email this link
    supporting image

    Here is a helpful infographic that details who will be included in the next phases, and when they are expected to be rolled out:


  • Inslee announces “Healthy Washington–Roadmap to Recovery”

    Share on Facebook Share on Twitter Share on Linkedin Email this link
    supporting image

    The state will shift to a two-phase system in accordance with regional case counts.

    Gov. Jay Inslee today announced “Healthy Washington — Roadmap to Recovery,” a COVID-19 phased recovery plan. Beginning on January 11, the state will follow a regional recovery approach with every region beginning in Phase 1.

    “No one was untouched by the effects of the pandemic in 2020; many have and continue to suffer through no fault of their own,” Inslee said during a press conference Tuesday. “We aren’t out of this yet, but we are close to turning the corner on COVID-19 and this third wave of infection.”

    Washington has avoided overwhelming the state’s health care systems throughout this pandemic so far through rigorous safety measures, such as physical distancing and masking, as well as social and economic restrictions. This new recovery system aims to safely ease some restrictions while also maintaining crucial hospital capacity, ensuring care for Washingtonians that need it and paving the way for economic recovery.

    You can read the rest of the story on Governor Inslee's Medium page: Healthy Washington — Roadmap to Recovery.

  • City Council Approves 2nd Round of Small Business & Non-Profit Grants; CARES Act Reimbursement is Completed.

    Share on Facebook Share on Twitter Share on Linkedin Email this link
    supporting image

    At its December 15th Regular Meeting the Sammamish City Council approved a second round of its local small business and non-profit grant program. The program was put in place to aid Sammamish based small businesses and non-profits impacted by the COVID-19 pandemic.

    There were a total of 83 applications, which staff reviewed against eligibility criteria established by the City Council:

    • A maximum of 25 FTEs
    • Physically located within Sammamish
    • An active Sammamish Business License
    • Been in operation in Sammamish since June 1, 2019
    • Sustained a 25% or greater loss in second-quarter year-over-year revenues
    • Nonprofits must be registered as a 501(c)(3) with the IRS
    • Cannot be owned or partially owned by a current City of Sammamish employee or Councilmember or an immediate family member of a current City of Sammamish employee or Councilmember.

    Eighty out of the 83 applications met the criteria and will be awarded grants. Out of the 80 applicants, 26 were returning applicants who received $10,000 funding from the City of Sammamish’s first round of its small business recovery grants program.

    In this second round, a total of $804,000 in grant funding was approved. New applicants will receive up to $15,000 each and returning applicants will receive up to $5,000 each.

    Altogether, combining the City’s first round of grants awarding $420,000, the second round of grants awarding $804,000, plus emergency funding of $315,000 to local non-profits, the City of Sammamish has allocated $1,539,000 in COVID-19 relief grants towards local small businesses and non-profits thus far.


    In additional news, City Manager Dave Rudat reported that the City of Sammamish has now received the reimbursement of the entire $2,898,450 in CARES Act funds from the Washington Department of Commerce. “By allocating the CARES Act funds towards Eastside Fire & Rescue’s (EF&R) COVID-19 expenses, we were able to use that budget savings to provide continued COVID-19 support to the community without the date restrictions associated with federal funds,” said Rudat. “Many cities are scrambling to spend their CARES Act allocation by the December 31st deadline. Thanks to the unanimous vote by City Council approving staff's recommendation on CARES Act funds allocation, we are in a position to use these funds to address the second wave of COVID-19’s impact on our community. This approach allows the City to continue supporting Sammamish based small businesses, non-profits, and government operations into 2021.”


    Read more about how the City of Sammamish is allocating the $2.9 million in CARES Act Funds received here:

    Sammamish City Council Unanimously Votes “Yes” to the City Manager’s Recommendation to Seek Reimbursement of $2.9M in CARES Act Funding;

    Action Earmarks $2.9M Towards Continued COVID-19 Response into the Winter Months and 2021


    Read more about the City of Sammamish’s first-round Small Business Support Grant program here:

    Sammamish City Council Approves Small Business Recovery Grants



  • Emergency Manager's Report to City Council on COVID-19 (December 15, 2020)

    Share on Facebook Share on Twitter Share on Linkedin Email this link
    supporting image

    Andrew Stevens, CEM - Emergency Manager -Eastside Fire & Rescue

    Good evening Mayor, Council members, and City Manager.

    Nearly 10 months ago, when I first came before this council to present upon the first cases of Coronavirus to reach the U.S. in our neighboring community Kirkland, I do not believe that many of us would have foreseen what would come through the remainder of 2020. Over 300,000 Americans have died as a result of this pandemic, and the past month has brought us several of the worst single-day fatality counts in modern history, including a single-day record of over 3000 COVID-19 deaths just last week. Across the nation, cases continue to exponentially climb, as current mitigations struggle against the runaway community spread, and in some areas of the County non-compliance with public health recommendations appear to be more of the norm versus the exception.

    The reality that the current state of the pandemic is at its worse point since it began is a hard pill to swallow, but recent advancements in the fight against COVID-19 will hopefully begin to turn the tide in the next few months. Across the nation, the first COVID-19 vaccines are being delivered and provided to front-line medical workers and those populations most vulnerable to severe illness and death from the virus. With additional vaccines seeking FDA authorization for emergency use, and a robust logistical network being stood up to begin widely distributing the vaccine, authorities are predicting that the US could see widespread herd immunity by the summer of 2021. While it is fantastic news that we now appear to have effective and safe vaccines available that protect from the coronavirus, it is so very important to understand that without widespread compliance with all other public health recommendations, especially during the widespread outbreak the US is currently experiencing, many tens of thousands, if not hundreds of thousands, may die until herd immunity is achieved.

    Another change that will come as a relief to Sammamish residents was the addition of a free, high-capacity COVID testing site in Bellevue, the first such location on the Eastside. The drive-through Bellevue site will be open Monday through Saturday, from 9 to 5, and appointments are recommended, but not required. I would like to remind everyone that these testing sites are for those who have symptoms and need a COVID-19 test. They are not to be used to confirm COVID negativity so that one may socialize over the holidays.

    A few weeks ago, the City released a COVID-19 Impact Survey to provide insight into the needs of our residents which may not have been overly visible due to the nature of this incident. The survey has seen remarkable participation, with over 1000 responses so far. The results provide key insight into the needs of the community, and how the City Council may elect to address those needs through additional funding or support. Here are a few important takeaways:

    • 6.8% of respondents were recently unemployed due to COVID – some of which left their jobs to assist their families at home.
    • 3.5% of respondents claim to be experiencing extreme financial stress
    • The greatest concerns of the respondents were becoming infected with COVID-19, the overall safety of the community, helping children with school, access to childcare, and access to medical and mental health services.
    • There were 12 residents very concerned about housing continuity and 13 very concerned about access to food.

    The survey was distributed to the community through a variety of means, including the City’s newsletter, social media, and a postcard mailed to every household. The model has been shared in the region and neighboring jurisdictions are already beginning to roll-out similar needs assessments. The plan is to continue accepting responses until the end of the month to provide residents with additional opportunities to participate. I have been meeting with my colleagues in the City to discuss the results of the survey, and I believe that Sammamish’s Human Services Coordinator will be addressing the Council following my report to provide greater insight into the current organizational needs of non-profits providing assistance. The Council will be addressing the second round of business and non-profit grants later this evening. To assist in those discussions, I wanted to provide a quick update concerning the incident expenses so far. To date, the City has spent roughly $1.1 million of the $2.9 million earmarked for COVID-19 response and recovery, $420K of which went to small business grants in the previous round of funding, and $315K which has gone to support human service organizations.

    Lastly, I would like to thank the residents of Sammamish for their continued resiliency in the face of this pandemic. This community has rallied together to support one another throughout this entire event and continues to do so. The pandemic has affected us all in countless ways, and as the winter months and holiday seasons are now upon us, social isolation will become more and more emotionally and mentally taxing. If you are in need of services or are seeking information on how to connect to the various organizations assisting those impacted by this crisis, please do not hesitate to reach out to the City for support.

    I wish everyone a safe and healthy holiday and new year. Thank you.

  • Bloodworks Northwest is now testing all blood donations for COVID-19 antibodies.

    Share on Facebook Share on Twitter Share on Linkedin Email this link
    supporting image

    Learn if you have the antibodies powerful in helping critically ill coronavirus patients when you give blood through December 31. Your test results will indicate if your immune system has produced antibodies to the virus, regardless of whether you ever showed symptoms. There’s a helpful Q&A on the Bloodworks website that tells ou everything you need to know about antibody testing. Be a COVID-19 hero and schedule your one-hour appointment today at any of the Bloodworks NW Donor Centers or Pop-up’s.

    Sign-up HERE https://dslnk.co/BloodworksWADev

    Results are mailed two weeks after donation, more details at https://www.bloodworksnw.org/covid19study/antibody-testing

    Go to bloodworksnw.org to learn more

  • EXPANSION OF TESTING INTO THE EASTSIDE OF KING COUNTY

    Share on Facebook Share on Twitter Share on Linkedin Email this link
    supporting image

    Reprinted from Public Health Insider:

    Starting this week, there will be a new option for convenient, free COVID-19 testing on the Eastside. A new site at Bellevue College will open on Tuesday, expanding efforts to control the spread of COVID-19 in east King County and along the I-90 corridor. This will be the first free, high-capacity COVID-19 test site on the Eastside. This site will be free and open to anyone, regardless of insurance or immigration status.

    If you have COVID-like symptoms or have had close contact with someone with COVID-19, Public Health – Seattle & King County urges you to avoid contact with others and get tested immediately. Stay home and away from others while you are waiting for test results.

    The new test site is located at Bellevue College, 2645 145th Ave SE, Bellevue, WA 98007. The entrance is on 148th Ave SE. Drive-thru and limited walk-up testing is available. The test site is available via the 221, 226, 228, 245, and 271 bus lines.

    The test site will be open Monday through Saturday, 9:00 a.m. – 5:00 p.m., beginning Tuesday, December 15. People are strongly encouraged, but not required, to register for a testing appointment. Visit http://www.ichs.com/free-covid-19-testing for scheduling and registration. Visit www.kingcounty.gov/covid/sites to see information on all free test sites, including Bellevue College.

    The test site will be operated by International Community Health Services (ICHS) and hosted by Bellevue College, with support from King County and the City of Bellevue.

    Clients will not be charged for testing. Bring your insurance card and driver’s license if you have them. No one will be turned away if they do not have insurance or a driver’s license. Language interpretation available.

    Originally published on December 11, 2020.

  • Emergency Manager's Report to City Council on COVID-19 (December 1, 2020)

    Share on Facebook Share on Twitter Share on Linkedin Email this link
    supporting image

    Andrew Stevens, CEM - Emergency Manager - Eastside Fire & Rescue

    Good evening Mayor, Councilmembers, and City Manager.

    As someone who has been immersed in COVID-19 response and recovery since February, it was extremely disheartening to see millions of US residents, during the worst COVID surge yet, travel and gather together over the past holiday weekend. While this was frustrating to me, I can only imagine how the frontline medical workers, who have been pushed to the brink fighting this virus, must have felt to see so many ignore the warnings from public health officials to limit contact and to not travel.

    November was a tough month for the U.S.’s pandemic response. By all expectations, December will be worse. The United States reported more than 4 million coronavirus cases in November, which is higher than the total number of cases seen all year by any country in the world except India and Brazil. Public health experts are warning that we will keep seeing record-breaking numbers in the final month of 2020. The nation surpassed 100,000 daily cases for the first time on November 4, and then more than 200,000 daily cases for the first time on November 28. Over the last weekend, the U.S. also surpassed 90,000 coronavirus hospitalizations for the first time ever. The county now sits at roughly 13.7 million cases, up 2.4 million in the past two weeks, and roughly 270,000 deaths.

    The State of Washington, King County, and Sammamish all saw massive increases in COVID-19 cases and hospitalizations through November. And while the surge may appear to be decreasing, the data from the past several days is incomplete, many testing centers were temporarily closed over the holiday weekend, and the data does not yet reflect the number of individuals exposed at holiday gatherings but are not yet symptomatic. With an incubation period of up to two weeks, public health officials are expecting even greater increases in cases through the next two weeks. The City of Sammamish has now seen 555 cases of COVID-19, up 213 from Nov 1st. A 62% increase in total cases in the last month alone.

    Sammamish residents have been feeling the impacts of COVID for nearly 10 months now and are two weeks into additional restrictions that will last until mid-December or longer. To help guide the City Council on how they may elect its continuing community support, staff released a COVID-19 Impact survey to gauge and identify the needs of those affected by both COVID and the COVID mitigation measures. So far, 367 residents have completed the assessment. Some of the key take takeaways include:

    • 9.5% of respondents stated that they are recently unemployed due to COVID
    • 15% of respondents are experiencing extreme or high levels of financial-related stress
    • 20 respondents were very concerned with their continued ability to pay for housing
    • 74 respondents were very concerned about their mental health and wellness
    • Of all the various concerns we rated, 73% began with the COVID pandemic, roughly 12% are due to the recent statewide restrictions

    Wanting to capture an even larger response pool, and in an effort to reach more vulnerable populations, the City is also mailing postcards promoting the survey to each household in the City. We are encouraged by the early participation in the survey and hope that residents will continue to participate.

    To date, the City of Sammamish has spent roughly $1,080,000 on its COVID-19 response and recovery operations, leaving roughly $1.8 million in funding earmarked for continued COVID-19 response. The survey, in combination with feedback provided by the City’s Human Services Coordinator, provides insight into where additional support is needed. It is my understanding that the Council is looking to release the second round of business grants at its next regular meeting. It would be my recommendation to also review and decide upon parameters for additional support to human service organizations serving those impacted soon. Depending on whether certain federal programs expire in late December will weigh considerably on the amount and type of assistance that may be needed.

    As I am sure you are aware, there is not yet an authorized or approved vaccine for COVID-19, however, there are multiple vaccines under development that are providing promising results. Even if a vaccine is approved for emergency distribution, it will not be widely available for many months. The first supplies of the vaccine will be limited and given first to specific groups at highest risk, such as healthcare workers and people in nursing homes.

    The State of Washington and King County Public Health have been working to establish plans, procedures, and the logistical systems needed for eventual vaccine distribution. When the vaccine is widely available, healthcare clinics, pharmacies, and drive-through and walk-through clinics will most likely provide vaccinations. In the meantime, it is important that everyone continues to practice all other COVID-19 mitigations, as it will be several more months until there is widespread vaccination across all populations.

    Lastly, I would like to urge all residents listening to download and utilize the new COVID-19 exposure tool, WA Notify, on their smartphones. This tool utilizes anonymous data to alert you if you were in the presence of someone who tested positive for COVID-19. It is safe, secure, and will greatly assist in contact tracing abilities that previously would not have existed. It’s just one more tool in our toolbox to help slow the spread of this virus.

    Thank you.

    If you have not already taken the Sammamish Community Assessment Survey, please access it here: https://connect.sammamish.us/covid-19-updates/survey_tools/community-survey

    Read more about WA Notify here: https://connect.sammamish.us/covid-19-updates/news_feed/inslee-announces-statewide-covid-19-exposure-notification-tool

  • COVID-19 vaccine fact page new available in 17 languages

    Share on Facebook Share on Twitter Share on Linkedin Email this link
    supporting image

    Currently, there is no authorized or approved vaccine for COVID-19. While we wait for vaccines to be approved, Public Health – Seattle & King County is working with the Washington State Department of Health on plans, procedures, and systems for eventual vaccine distribution.

    Please see the fact page in English here: https://www.kingcounty.gov/depts/health/covid-19/vaccine.aspx

    This information is now available in: