COVID-19 Information & Resources

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Please note that King County Public Health should remain your primary source of information on the COVID-19 (coronavirus) outbreak. Please check out their COVID-19 Data Dashboards for the latest statistics. To see recent news on this page, click here.

For the latest Washington State-level COVID-19 health guidance, statistics and resources, visit Coronavirus.wa.gov.

What is COVID-19?

COVID-19 (formerly known as the “novel coronavirus”) is a new virus strain spreading from person-to-person.

How does COVID-19 spread?

  • Through respiratory droplets when an infected person coughs or sneezes
  • Between people who are in close contact with one another (within about 6 feet)
  • By touching

Please note that King County Public Health should remain your primary source of information on the COVID-19 (coronavirus) outbreak. Please check out their COVID-19 Data Dashboards for the latest statistics. To see recent news on this page, click here.

For the latest Washington State-level COVID-19 health guidance, statistics and resources, visit Coronavirus.wa.gov.

What is COVID-19?

COVID-19 (formerly known as the “novel coronavirus”) is a new virus strain spreading from person-to-person.

How does COVID-19 spread?

  • Through respiratory droplets when an infected person coughs or sneezes
  • Between people who are in close contact with one another (within about 6 feet)
  • By touching a surface or object with the virus and then touching the mouth, nose, or eyes

What are the symptoms?

People who have been diagnosed with novel coronavirus have reported symptoms that may appear in as few as 2 days or as long as 14 days after exposure to the virus. Those symptoms include fever, cough, shortness of breath, and/or difficulty breathing.

Who is most vulnerable?

People at higher risk include those:

  • Over 60 years of age
  • With underlying health conditions including include heart disease, asthma or other lung disease, or diabetes
  • With weakened immune systems
  • Who are pregnant

Anyone who has questions about whether their condition puts them at risk for severe COVID-19 illness should consult with their healthcare providers. Be sure to call your provider before going to the office in person.

What is the City of Sammamish doing?

On March 3rd, the City of Sammamish activated its Emergency Operations Center (EOC) in response to the coronavirus outbreak and formed an internal COVID-19 Task Force. The operational objectives of the City were to:

  • Adopt and widely promote the below Non-Pharmaceutical Intervention recommendations (NPIs) from the WA State Public Health Agency; and
  • Update Continuity of Government/Operations Plan for pandemic response to ensure continuity of all essential government functions while protecting the health and welfare of City personnel; and
  • Provide clear public information that directs to or is consistent with State and Local Public Health messaging regarding the outbreak and protective actions.

On March 5, the City of Sammamish issued a proclamation of local emergency in order to support measures to be taken to protect public health, safety and welfare within the City. This declaration was approved by City Council at their March 10 meeting. The full proclamation is available here, and the press release can be found here.

The City of Sammamish Emergency Manager continues to participate in daily conference calls with the King County Office of Emergency Management, Public Health - Seattle & King County, jurisdictions from across the region, and community stakeholders, to facilitate the regional coordination of information and resources.

COVID-19 is an active situation that changes daily. The City of Sammamish is proactively working to mitigate the impacts from COVID-19 on our community. This portal will continually be updated to provide up-to-date information and resources to assist you through the coronavirus outbreak.

  • FEMA Authorized to Use Disaster Funds to Supplement Unemployment Benefits

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    To help ease the financial burden on those who are unemployed because of the coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic, President Trump authorized FEMA to use Stafford Act disaster relief funds to provide supplemental payments for lost wages due to the COVID-19 pandemic. Up to $44 billion in Disaster Relief Funding is available to support this initiative.

    FEMA will provide funding to states and territories that request and apply for assistance. Unemployed Americans who have lost wages because of COVID-19 may be eligible for assistance.

    On March 13, 2020, President Trump declared a national emergency concerning the novel coronavirus disease (COVID-19). Since then, all 50 states, five territories, the Seminole Tribe of Florida and the District of Columbia were approved for major disaster declarations to assist with additional needs. The new funding for lost wages is in addition to the $8.8 billion FEMA has already obligated in support of COVID-19 efforts.

    FEMA is working closely with the White House and other federal agency partners to develop guidance on the process for states and territories to easily request and receive funds. States and territories may provide eligible individuals $400 per week, with a $300 federal contribution. The states and territories will administer the program and distribute the funds through their regular unemployment insurance system, as a supplemental payment.

    This program will be applied retroactively to the week ending August 1 and continues through no later than December 6, 2020, or until the balance of the Disaster Relief Fund reaches $25 billion, or Congress enacts a replacement unemployment relief program.

    Individuals who currently receive at least $100 per week of unemployment compensation benefits, and provide self-certification that they are unemployed, or are unable or unavailable to work due to disruptions caused by COVID-19 are eligible for the supplement through their state or territory unemployment office.

    More here: FEMA_Advisory_LostWages_final_v2a_20200809.pdf

  • Housing Stabilization Assistance for Veterans and Family Members Affected by COVID-19

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    The King County Veterans Program has established Housing Stabilization Assistance funds for veterans, service members and their families affected by COVID-19. Please visit here for more information.


  • Commerce distributing state CARES Act funding to community agencies that will operate assistance program to pay past due rent and prevent future evictions

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    From the Washington State Department of Commerce:

    OLYMPIA, WA – The Washington State Department of Commerce is distributing approximately $100 million in state Coronavirus Aid, Relief and Economic Security (CARES) Act funding through its existing network of homeless services grantees and organizations serving homeless youth to operate a new rent assistance program launched Aug. 1. The program will focus on preventing evictions by paying up to three months of past due, current and future rent to landlords for eligible participants.

    “Funds addressing Washington’s homelessness crisis were limited before the pandemic, and the need is deepening as this pandemic continues to push more people toward the brink while we work to carefully reopen our economy,” said Commerce Director Lisa Brown. “We are targeting limited resources as quickly and equitably as possible, to those with the greatest needs.”

    This rent assistance program will address some of the need resulting from the coronavirus pandemic, and hopes to reduce some of the stress both renters and landlords are facing now and in the future. Rent assistance is limited to three months and the program ends Dec. 31, 2020.

    A survey recently showed 17% of renters in Washington state missed their July rent payment. Since February, state’s employment has declined 12% – over twice that of the worst point in the Great Recession – and use of basic food assistance programs has increased by 15%.

    Commerce provided guidance and formula-based grant amounts to its Consolidated Homeless Grant program lead grantees and organizations serving the Office of Homeless Youth in every county of the state. These organizations will use grant funds to provide up to three months of rent assistance that will be paid to landlords on an eligible client’s behalf. Complete program information is on the Commerce web page.

    Equity is a primary program goal, with a focus on groups of people who historically have not been provided equitable access to rent assistance and those who have been disproportionately impacted by the COVID-19 outbreak. These communities include ethnic and racial minorities, immigrants and refugees, individuals who identify as LGBTQ+, individuals with disabilities or who are deaf and Native Americans.

    Funding is expected to begin making its way into communities late this week.

  • Governor Inslee Announces Rollbacks to Some Activities to Slow COVID-19 Exposure

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    Governor Jay Inslee and Secretary of Health John Wiesman today announced changes to “Safe Start,” Washington’s phased approach to reopening. The changes target activities that data have shown provide a higher risk of COVID-19 exposure.

    It has been four months since the governor announced the state’s “Stay Home, Stay Healthy” order. Since then, cases in Washington have risen from 2,000 to almost 50,000, and deaths have increased from 110 to nearly 1,500.

    To combat the rising numbers, the governor and secretary are changing guidance and regulations around restaurants, bars, and fitness centers, as well as weddings and funerals. The changes will also affect family entertainment centers, movie theaters and card rooms.

    “We do not take these steps lightly. We know every prohibition is a challenge for individuals and business owners,” Inslee said during a press conference Thursday. “But we know that if we fail to act, we expose people and businesses to even greater risk down the line.”

    Read the rest of the story on the governor's Medium page.

  • New Park Rule Requires Residents to Follow Posted Signage at City Parks

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    On July 21st, the Sammamish City Council adopted an ordinance requiring all park users to follow posted signage at City parks. The new park rule includes any and all signs communicating COVID-19 restrictions established by the Governor’s phased reopening plan. As part of Phase 2 guidelines, outdoor recreation is restricted to five or fewer people outside a household and is part of the Governor’s data-driven approach to reopen Washington and encourage social distancing measures while minimizing the health impacts of COVID-19. Despite the Governor’s physical distancing orders, the Sammamish City Council; the Sammamish Police Department; the Parks, Recreation, and Facilities Department; and the Sammamish community have observed park users gathering in large groups well beyond the Governor’s guidelines, which threatens the preservation of the public health, safety, and general welfare of the community. Violation of posted signage in a City park may now include a fine up to $500.

  • Sammamish Emergency Manager's July 21 Report to City Council on COVID-19

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    This is the complete text of the report that was delivered live to City Council at their Regular Meeting the evening of Tuesday, July 21, 2020.

    Andrew Stevens, CEM - Emergency Manager, Eastside Fire & Rescue

    Good evening Mayor, Council members, and City Manager.

    Thank you again for allowing me with the opportunity to provide a brief situational update on COVID-19

    In the past two weeks, the global coronavirus case count has risen by roughly 3 million, with the United States’ total positive count increasing to nearly 4 million cases. Two weeks ago, I reported that the majority of states across the nation were again experiencing rapid increases in case counts, hospitalizations, and fatalities. That unfortunately still holds true today, even in Washington.

    A recent statewide situation report published by the Washington State Department of Health outlined a grim reality, highlighting the alarming trends statewide in both COVID-19 transmission rates and hospitalization data. Currently, most areas of the state are at extreme risk of negating all the gains made during the past several months of lockdown. Daily case counts are surpassing any of the State’s previous peaks from back in March. The greatest increases in positive cases are tied to the younger population, especially among the 20-29 year-old age group, highlighting the fact that these increases are more tied to social and workplace exposures than any other factor.

    Sammamish is also seeing an increase in cases. We are currently sitting at 152 positive cases, with an increase of 9 new cases from yesterday. That is the single highest daily new case total for the City since the outbreak began. There have been multiple other days in July with new daily case counts of 4 or 5. To put that in context, the daily counts for Sammamish were averaging around 1 or 2, with numerous days showing no new cases through most of April, May, and June. By most metrics, everything is looking worse. The Washington Department of Health stated that we are in the early stages of an exponential statewide outbreak that would have zero chances of being reversed without widespread changes in behavior and policy. One could assume that we will begin to see rollbacks in the State’s phased reopening plan soon.


    In previous City Council meetings, I have been asked questions during my report which, if I could not provide an answer to then, responded to Council via email following the meeting. I would like to address some of those question now for the public. Two weeks ago, Councilmember Stuart asked a question concerning the enforcement of statewide orders related to COVID-19, such as the mandatory wearing of face coverings. Yes, the orders are enforceable by law under RCW 43.06.220(5). However, as stated by the governor himself, he would prefer that compliance with these orders be done through persuasion and not prosecution. The Council could mandate that Sammamish PD strongly pursue and cite those not complying with these orders, but we would most likely be the only jurisdiction in the state doing so. To complicate the issue, exemptions in the governor's order for reasons why individuals may not be required to wear a mask or comply with any other section of the order, would make it nearly impossible for an officer to prove otherwise in the field.

    A question regarding Sammamish PD’s and Eastside Fire & Rescue's use of PPE was also asked. Both PD, EFR, and City staff are required to comply with the statewide face covering mandate and have all developed the internal polices and directives requiring all employees to do so.

    Lastly, due to the success of this month’s earlier mask distribution event, Sammamish has requested an additional 16,000 masks from King County and a plan to again provide the free cloth face coverings to the public will be announced soon.

    Thank you.

  • Bloodworks Pop-Up Donation Center in Sammamish July 21-31

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    Donate at the Bloodworks Northwest Pop-Up Donor Center at Sammamish Presbyterian Church

    A message from Bloodworks Northwest:

    From July 21st through 31st Sammamish Presbyterian Church will be hosting a new Pop-Up Donor Center, providing donors a convenient, local location to donate blood. July is generally one of the lowest months for blood donation, and COVID-19 has placed increased strain on the blood supply at local hospitals.

    The governors of both Washington and Oregon recognize the crucial role that Bloodworks donors fill in sustaining community health, so leaving home to donate blood is a crucial and safe activity exempt from both states’ stay-at-home orders. Local, state, and national leaders are unanimous – donating blood remains a critical and safe activity for community health.

    “During the height of the COVID-19 pandemic, many surgeries were cancelled or postponed and the healthcare system is now working hard to catch up,” said Dr. Eileen Bulger, Harborview Trauma Surgeon. “In addition, emergency surgery for serious injuries can’t be postponed and the summer season is the busiest time for our Level 1 Trauma center at Harborview Medical Center. We rely on blood donors and Bloodworks Northwest to ensure that we have the life-saving blood products needed at this critical time.”

    All donations at this Pop-Up Donor Center and our other Donor Centers are by appointment only to provide the safest donation environment and adhere to all social distancing guidelines. Additionally, no walk-ins, guests, or people under age 16 are permitted onsite. Masks are required by all donors and staff. Your one-hour donation appointment is a safe and essential action to support local hospitals.


    Sammamish Pop-Up Donor Center

    Sammamish Presbyterian Church

    July 21st through 31st

    22522 NE Inglewood Hill Road

    Sammamish, WA 98074

    Appointments are required and can be made here or calling 1-800-398-7888

    Due to the increased need for donations, all donors in July will be automatically entered into the Pump It Up Sweepstakes for a chance to win a Peloton Bike.

    Have a question? Email us. For more information regarding blood donation during COVID-19, visit bloodworksnw.org/coronavirus.

  • Governor announces new limit on social gatherings and a ban on live entertainment across the state

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    As cases of COVID-19 continue to increase across the state, Governor Jay Inslee and Sec. of Health John Wiesman announced a new limit on social gatherings and a ban on live entertainment across the state.

    “The steps are necessary to slow down the spread of COVID-19. The unfortunate truth is that we can’t let our guard down, even as we engage in more activities,” Inslee said during a press conference Thursday. “As we inch closer to the fall, we are already on an unsustainable path in the spread of this virus. We have to change to save lives and to avoid turning the dial back further on the activities we enjoy.”

    Under the new Safe Start phase limits, the number of individuals allowed in social gatherings during Phase 3 will be reduced from 50 people to 10 people. Counties in Phase 2, which includes King County, may continue to have social gatherings of up to five people.

    Additionally, the governor and secretary announced a prohibition on all live entertainment, indoor or outdoor, statewide. This includes drive-in concerts, comedy clubs and music in restaurants.

    The orders go into effect Monday, July 20.

    Read the rest of the story on the governor's Medium page.

  • Supporting local farms: Get fresh produce, berries, flowers, cheese and more using King County’s new Local Food Finder

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    King County Executive Dow Constantine today launched Local Food Finder, an interactive map that identifies convenient ways customers can get fresh produce, berries, flowers, meat, honey, cheese, and more delivered from local farms to their doorstep, to a nearby pickup location, or picked up directly at the farm.

    The mobile-friendly map is one of several ways King County is supporting local farmers who have been severely impacted by the COVID-19 pandemic that has disrupted farmers markets and restaurant sales. It is a product of the Local Food Initiative that Executive Constantine created in 2014 to strengthen King County’s local food economy and increase equitable access to healthy, affordable food.

    “We are making it easier than ever to get fresh food and flowers delivered directly from local farms or arrange for convenient pickup right at the farm,” said Executive Constantine. “Our new Local Food Finder is one of many ways we are supporting farmers who have been hit hard by the COVID-19 pandemic. We will continue to mobilize resources and offer innovative solutions that connect farmers to more customers, strengthening our local food economy.” Read the full story.

  • Sammamish Emergency Manager's July 7 Report to Council on COVID-19

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    This is the full text of the report read to City Council at their July 7, 2020 meeting:

    Andrew Stevens, CEM - Emergency Manager, Eastside Fire & Rescue

    Good evening once again Mayor, Councilmembers, and City Manager.

    Thank you again for allowing me with the opportunity to provide a brief situational update on COVID-19.

    The global count of coronavirus cases falls just short of 12 million confirmed positive cases, with the U.S. accounting for one quarter of that number. To make matters worse, over the past few weeks, the majority of U.S. states have seen sharp increases in positive cases of COVID-19, with many states, including Washington, breaking records for daily new case totals.

    We are seeing in real time the repercussions of disregarding the threat posed by this virus. States are now rolling back reopening plans and implementing new mandates and public health orders in the hope to urge compliance with COVID-19 mitigations. Yet, cases and hospitalizations continue to increase. Across the nation, hospitals and ICUs are once again strained or filled beyond capacity, and yet the simplest of tools proven to greatly slow the spread of COVID-19, a face mask, has been turned into a political argument rather than a widely embraced, invaluable resource in the fight against this pandemic.

    Nearly every day, something new is discovered by scientists and medical professionals relating to this illness. How COVID-19 can create long-term morbidity issues, how it spreads far easier than what was previously thought, or how it may result in acute medical issues for months after first becoming infected. Yet so many individuals are entirely dismissive, or worse, blatantly throwing caution to the wind. I read an article the other day about a medically vulnerable child who died from COVID-19 after her parents took her to a party with roughly 100 people. There was no social distancing or masks being worn at this event. What is so troubling is that the terrible outcome was 100% preventable. Most individuals, let alone parents, would be shocked by what happened, yet nearly every day I am witness to similar instances of unnecessary opportunities for exposure. It may be a parent lifting the caution tape on closed a playground so their kids can play with others, individuals disregarding barricades on closed docks where it is impossible to socially distance from others, or folks inviting all their friends over for a dinner party. But I said this before, we are not going to be able to enforce or regulate our way out of this crisis. It starts with personal accountability and ends when we are all working together to find common solutions. It means putting everyone’s welfare above our own personal inconveniences or wants.

    Having said that though, Sammamish continues to be a leader in fighting COVID-19. Since this outbreak began, our residents have overwhelmingly shown their support of, and compliance with, all non-pharmaceutical interventions. We continue to have one of the lowest per capita rates of confirmed cases and fatalities in the state. I also see widespread compliance with the State’s face covering mandate. In fact, last Wednesday, the City organized a free cloth mask distribution event. In just five hours, over 10,500 masks were provided to over 1,350 households. This event would have been impossible without the efforts of the Sammamish ACERT volunteers, our Parks and recreation staff and volunteers, and Sammamish PD officers and explorers. Behind the scenes, the event was also greatly assisted by the City’s amazing Comms team and Public Works personnel.

    The unbelievable turnout for this event highlights the resiliency of this community. Other jurisdictions across the county have held similar events with only a fraction of the attendees that Sammamish saw. So, a heartfelt thank you to all the residents who showed up and who will wear those masks while in public.

    With that, I will open it up to any questions you may have.