Equity, Diversity and Inclusion in Sammamish

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Developing policies that place equity and inclusion at the forefront takes time, resources, a commitment to learn, and a dedication to be inclusive. The City of Sammamish is committed to developing a plan that instills equity, diversity and inclusion as essential parts of policy making and the delivery of City services.


City of Sammamish's Proclamation Reaffirming Principles and Values

In 2016, the City of Sammamish reaffirmed our principles and values in the following proclamation:

As your City government, our role is to bring people together and not divide them. Our job is to be welcoming of all people and

Developing policies that place equity and inclusion at the forefront takes time, resources, a commitment to learn, and a dedication to be inclusive. The City of Sammamish is committed to developing a plan that instills equity, diversity and inclusion as essential parts of policy making and the delivery of City services.


City of Sammamish's Proclamation Reaffirming Principles and Values

In 2016, the City of Sammamish reaffirmed our principles and values in the following proclamation:

As your City government, our role is to bring people together and not divide them. Our job is to be welcoming of all people and all ideas in recognition that we truly are stronger and smarter together. We need to recognize certain essential principles and conduct our government and hopefully our lives consistent with those principles.

Consequently, as your City Council, we pledge:

  • To do all we can to foster civil discourse

  • To ensure that City services are always provided in a manner that does not discriminate on the basis of race, sex, religion, national origin, disability, sexual orientation or gender identity

  • To foster a community that always encourages people to achieve their potential and help others to do similarly

  • To protect our air, water and other parts of our natural environment to protect the health and futures of our families and future generations

  • To welcome, without reservation, new people from all parts of our world, with an abiding faith in their potential to be part of and strengthen our community

  • To never marginalize or demonize any person or group of people

  • To respect and listen to people and their ideas

  • To understand that we have a responsibility not just to ourselves but to others in our region including many who are not as fortunate

  • To do all we can to ensure that our children will inherit a world that includes all of the good that the world our parents brought us into had

  • To encourage that our national, state and regional leaders uphold these same values

  • We commit to regularly remind ourselves of these principles and to judge ourselves and our City by our adherence to them



Proclamation Declaring the City Sammamish Stands Together Against All Discrimination, Including Racial Violence and Harassment

In 2020, as a result of racial and social justice issues facing the United States, the City reaffirmed our position against discrimination with this proclamation:


WHEREAS the United States is founded on the principles that all persons, regardless of race, gender, sexual orientation, creed, or ethnicity, should be treated with dignity, respect, compassion and justice,


WHEREAS we have witnessed the mistreatment of people of color while in police custody, resulting in death and tragedy for their families, communities, and the nation,


WHEREAS on May 25, 2020, George Floyd died in Minneapolis, Minnesota shortly after his arrest in which an officer kneeled on his neck for 8 minutes and 46 seconds; and neither the officer nor any of the other arresting officers heeded Mr. Floyd’s request for help when he stated he could not breathe,


WHEREAS the nation is grappling with the pandemic caused by COVID-19, and there is misinformation and a false narrative being pushed by certain persons that blame China and Chinese people for its spread,


WHEREAS there has been an increase in anti-Asian violence nationwide, with reports of assault, verbal abuse, and discrimination against persons of Asian descent,


WHEREAS the City of Sammamish is a tolerant and peaceful community which values diversity, equality, justice, and human rights for all,


WHEREAS the City of Sammamish as stewards for public safety recognizes the right for peaceful and safe protest,


WHEREAS the City of Sammamish has a close working relationship with the Sammamish Chief of Police, Daniel Pingrey, and are confident Chief Pingrey and his officers share the same values around equality and justice,


WHEREAS the City of Sammamish is committed to creating an environment where all employees, contractors, elected officials, and commission members uphold and reflect these values of equality and justice,


NOW, THEREFORE, BE IT RESOLVED that the City of Sammamish stands in unity with the nation in its demand for racial justice and an end to all forms of racial violence.



  • Honoring Asian American and Pacific Islander Heritage Month

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    Join us during the month of May as we recognize and honor Asian American and Pacific Islander Heritage Month. This month we encourage everyone to pause and recognize the contributions and influence of Asian Americans and Pacific Islander Americans to the history, culture, and achievements of the United States.

    History of Asian Pacific Islander Heritage Month

    A former congressional staffer in the 1970s, Jeanie Jew, first approached the idea of designating a month to recognize Asian Pacific Americans, following the bicentennial celebrations. In June 1977, a United States House of Representatives resolution was introduced to proclaim the first ten days of May as Asian-Pacific Heritage Week. A similar bill was introduced in the Senate a month later.

    The proposed resolutions sought that May be designated for two reasons. For on May 7, 1843, the first Japanese immigrant arrived in the United States. More than two decades later, on May 10, 1869, the First Transcontinental Railroad was completed and Chinese labor was used to construct the railroad.

    President Jimmy Carter signed a joint resolution for the celebration on October 5, 1978.


    View a calendar of local virtual events hosted by the Seattle Center and national events hosted by Library of Congress.

    PBS Programming

    KCTS9 is offering a special program lineup in celebrating of Asian American and Pacific Islander Heritage Month. Click here to view the schedule.

    King County Libraries Reading List

    King County Libraries have compiled a resourceful and informative list of books to compliment this year’s Asian American and Pacific Islander Heritage Month.

    View the list of recommended books from KCLS here: https://kcls.bibliocommons.com/list/share/209743155/1848190189

  • April is National Volunteer Month

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    National Volunteer Month is observed each year during the month of April. It’s a month dedicated to promoting and celebrating volunteerism. This is a great time to recognize volunteer opportunities helping to ensure that our communities are thriving and initiatives supporting diversity, equality and inclusion are in the forefront.

    Celebrate Volunteerism and Get Involved

    Now more than ever, people helping others is worth celebrating. Volunteers make so much possible and deserve our appreciation. Each week, we will spotlight a volunteer opportunity on the City’s Facebook, Twitter and Instagram pages. Make sure to also check the Volunteer Opportunities tab on the City's Equity, Diversity and Inclusion page.

    How did National Volunteer Month start?

    National Volunteer Month first started as a week-long observation in 1974 and has continued to grow to now be a month-long celebration. In his proclamation declaring National Volunteer Week, President Richard Nixon urged all Americans to observe the week by seeking out a volunteer opportunity. He also called upon all communities to “recognize volunteers by observing the week with special ceremonies to honor those who have given countless hours for the betterment of our communities and the American way of life.” Since then, individuals, offices, schools, and teams volunteer their time during the month of April to make their communities better.

  • March is Women's History Month

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    At the March 2, 2021 Sammamish City Council Meeting, Mayor Karen Moran signed the proclamation declaring March as Women's History Month. View the proclamation here: Women's History Month Proclamation.


    History of Women's History Month

    Every year, March is designated Women’s History Month by Presidential proclamation. The month is set aside to honor women’s contributions in American history.


    Did You Know? Women’s History Month started as Women’s History Week

    Women’s History Month began as a local celebration in Santa Rosa, California. The Education Task Force of the Sonoma County (California) Commission on the Status of Women planned and executed a “Women’s History Week” celebration in 1978. The organizers selected the week of March 8 to correspond with International Women’s Day. The movement spread across the country as other communities initiated their own Women’s History Week celebrations the following year.

    In March 1987, Congress passed Public Law 100-9, designating March as “Women’s History Month.” Between 1988 and 1994, Congress passed additional resolutions requesting and authorizing the President to proclaim March of each year as Women’s History Month. Since 1995, each president has issued an annual proclamations designating the month of March as “Women’s History Month.”

    Read more at https://www.womenshistory.org/.


    King County Libraries Reading List
    King County Libraries have compiled a resourceful and informative list of books to recognize and honor Women’s History Month.

    View the list of recommended books from KCLS here:
    https://kcls.bibliocommons.com/list/share/209743155/860842487


    Women of Team Sammamish
    We want to take this month and honor women making a difference with the City of Sammamish, Sammamish Police Department and Eastside Fire and Rescue. Each day during the month of March, we will spotlight a woman from Team Sammamish on the City’s Facebook, Twitter and Instagram pages.

  • Celebrating and Honoring Black History Month

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    In recognition of the first day of Black History Month, The City of Sammamish has proclaimed the month of February as a month to recognize and honor Black History. The City’s Equity, Diversity and Inclusion page will be updated throughout the month with virtually events hosted by the Northwest African American Museum and informative resources by King County Libraries.

    Read the City of Sammamish’s Black History Month Proclamation: https://sammamishwa.civicweb.net/document/53704

    Northwest African American Museum
    The Northwest African American Museum invites you to celebrate Black History Month virtually this year with a full lineup of events.

    View a calendar of virtual events hosted by the NAAM here: https://www.naamnw.org/events

    King County Libraries Reading List
    King County Libraries have compiled a resourceful and informative list of books to compliment this year’s theme "The Black Family: Representation, Identity and Diversity" by the Association for the Study of African American Life and History.

    View the list of recommended books from KCLS here: https://kcls.bibliocommons.com/list/share/209743155/805471157

  • International Holocaust Remembrance Day

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    The United Nations General Assembly designated January 27—the anniversary of the liberation of Auschwitz-Birkenau—as International Holocaust Remembrance Day.

    On this annual day of commemoration, the UN urges every member state to honor the six million Jewish victims of the Holocaust and millions of other victims of Nazism and to develop educational programs to help prevent future genocides.

    Join the Conversation
    Share your reflections about International Holocaust Remembrance Day on social media using #WeRemember.

    The King County Library offers a list of books to explore in recognition of International Holocaust Remembrance Day: https://kcls.bibliocommons.com/list/share/388016847/1128778757

  • Black History Month Proclamation

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    At the January 19 City Council Meeting, Mayor Moran signed a proclamation recognizing and honoring February 2021 as Black History Month. Click here to view the Black History Month Proclamation.

    Throughout the month of February, we will offer informational resources on Black History here on the Equity, Diversity and Inclusion in Sammamish page.

  • We stand together against hate and hate speech.

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    During challenging times, the City of Sammamish would like to remind our residents and beyond about our commitment to equality, inclusiveness and diversity in our community.

    We stand together against hate and hate speech. Hate does not have a place in the City of Sammamish. Our diverse community represents the values that we reaffirmed in our proclamation to bring people together and not to divide them.

    Proclamation Declaring the City Sammamish Stands Together Against All Discrimination, Including Racial Violence and Harassment

  • January is National Slavery and Human Trafficking Prevention Month

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    As decreed by presidential proclamation, January is National Slavery and Human Trafficking Prevention Month. It is a key time to bring awareness and education to our community about modern day slavery and human trafficking to learn to spot the signs. The Department of Defense defines human trafficking as a crime in which force, fraud or coercion is used to compel a person to perform labor, services or commercial sex. It affects all populations: adults, children, men, women, foreign nationals and U.S. citizens, and all economic classes.

    Know the key indicators:

    • Does the person appear disconnected from family, friends, community organizations, or houses of worship?
    • Has a child stopped attending school?
    • Has the person had a sudden or dramatic change in behavior?
    • Is a juvenile engaged in commercial sex acts?
    • Is the person disoriented or confused, or showing signs of mental or physical abuse?
    • Does the person have bruises in various stages of healing?
    • Is the person fearful, timid, or submissive?
    • Does the person show signs of having been denied food, water, sleep, or medical care?
    • Is the person often in the company of someone to whom he or she defers? Or someone who seems to be in control of the situation, e.g., where they go or who they talk to?
    • Does the person appear to be coached on what to say?
    • Is the person living in unsuitable conditions?
    • Does the person lack personal possessions and appear not to have a stable living situation?
    • Does the person have freedom of movement? Can the person freely leave where they live? Are there unreasonable security measures?


    Get more information on Slavery and Human Trafficking Prevention here: U.S. Department of Defense
    Find books and online resources here:
    King County Library System (KCLS)

  • December is Universal Human Rights Month

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    Universal Human Rights Month is a time to come together and recognize equality, justice, and the dignity of all humans. This month is a time to honor the Universal Declaration of Human Rights, an international document stating the basic rights and fundamental freedoms to which all human beings are entitled. These rights include freedom from discrimination, the right to equality, and the right to be considered innocent until proven guilty.

    History

    The Universal Month for Human Rights started in 1948 when the United Nations wrote the Universal Declaration of Human Rights.

    How to Observe

    • Read a book about the Declaration of Human Rights, or about human rights in general: King County Library List
    • Spread the word on social media using #UniversalHumanRightsMonth
    • Go out of your way to treat everyone with respect, kindness, and equality
    • Teach others about why human rights for everyone are so important


    Read more about Human Rights Day recognized on December 10: United Nations Human Rights Day

  • November is Native American Heritage Month

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    Native American Heritage Month is also commonly referred to as American Indian and Alaska Native Heritage Month.

    The month is a time to celebrate rich and diverse cultures, traditions, and histories and to acknowledge the important contributions of Native people. Heritage Month is also an opportune time to educate the general public about tribes, to raise a general awareness about the unique challenges Native people have faced both historically and in the present, and the ways in which tribal citizens have worked to conquer these challenges.

    Read more here: https://nativeamericanheritagemonth.gov/

    Explore fiction, nonfiction, memoirs and poetry by Native American authors here: Native American Literature