Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion in Sammamish

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Developing policies that place equity and inclusion at the forefront takes time, resources, a commitment to learn, and a dedication to be inclusive. The City of Sammamish is committed to developing a plan that instills equity, diversity and inclusion as essential parts of policy making and the delivery of City services.


City of Sammamish's Proclamation Reaffirming Principles and Values of Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion

As your City government, our role is to bring people together and not divide them. Our job is to be welcoming of all people and all ideas in recognition that we truly are stronger and smarter

Developing policies that place equity and inclusion at the forefront takes time, resources, a commitment to learn, and a dedication to be inclusive. The City of Sammamish is committed to developing a plan that instills equity, diversity and inclusion as essential parts of policy making and the delivery of City services.


City of Sammamish's Proclamation Reaffirming Principles and Values of Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion

As your City government, our role is to bring people together and not divide them. Our job is to be welcoming of all people and all ideas in recognition that we truly are stronger and smarter together. We need to recognize certain essential principles and conduct our government and hopefully our lives consistent with those principles.

Consequently, as your City Council, we pledge:

  • To do all we can to foster civil discourse

  • To ensure that City services are always provided in a manner that does not discriminate on the basis of race, sex, religion, national origin, disability, sexual orientation or gender identity

  • To foster a community that always encourages people to achieve their potential and help others to do similarly

  • To protect our air, water and other parts of our natural environment to protect the health and futures of our families and future generations

  • To welcome, without reservation, new people from all parts of our world, with an abiding faith in their potential to be part of and strengthen our community

  • To never marginalize or demonize any person or group of people

  • To respect and listen to people and their ideas

  • To understand that we have a responsibility not just to ourselves but to others in our region including many who are not as fortunate

  • To do all we can to ensure that our children will inherit a world that includes all of the good that the world our parents brought us into had

  • To encourage that our national, state and regional leaders uphold these same values

  • We commit to regularly remind ourselves of these principles and to judge ourselves and our City by our adherence to them



Proclamation Declaring the City Sammamish Stands Together Against All Discrimination, Including Racial Violence and Harassment

WHEREAS the United States is founded on the principles that all persons, regardless of race, gender, sexual orientation, creed, or ethnicity, should be treated with dignity, respect, compassion and justice,


WHEREAS we have witnessed the mistreatment of people of color while in police custody, resulting in death and tragedy for their families, communities, and the nation,


WHEREAS on May 25, 2020, George Floyd died in Minneapolis, Minnesota shortly after his arrest in which an officer kneeled on his neck for 8 minutes and 46 seconds; and neither the officer nor any of the other arresting officers heeded Mr. Floyd’s request for help when he stated he could not breathe,


WHEREAS the nation is grappling with the pandemic caused by COVID-19, and there is misinformation and a false narrative being pushed by certain persons that blame China and Chinese people for its spread,


WHEREAS there has been an increase in anti-Asian violence nationwide, with reports of assault, verbal abuse, and discrimination against persons of Asian descent,


WHEREAS the City of Sammamish is a tolerant and peaceful community which values diversity, equality, justice, and human rights for all,


WHEREAS the City of Sammamish as stewards for public safety recognizes the right for peaceful and safe protest,


WHEREAS the City of Sammamish has a close working relationship with the Sammamish Chief of Police, Daniel Pingrey, and are confident Chief Pingrey and his officers share the same values around equality and justice,


WHEREAS the City of Sammamish is committed to creating an environment where all employees, contractors, elected officials, and commission members uphold and reflect these values of equality and justice,


NOW, THEREFORE, BE IT RESOLVED that the City of Sammamish stands in unity with the nation in its demand for racial justice and an end to all forms of racial violence.


  • National Hispanic Heritage Month Starts September 15

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    September 15 kicks off the celebration of National Hispanic Heritage Month. We celebrate the Latino and Hispanic communities that have made extraordinary contributions to our country. From activists to workers, our past successes are thanks to the Hispanic community, and our future accomplishments will be because of our combined work with the Hispanic community.

    Why does Hispanic Heritage Month Start on September 15?

    Rather than starting at the beginning of September, Hispanic Heritage Month takes place over 30 days starting on the 15th -- a nod to the anniversaries of national independence for a number of Latin American countries: Costa Rica, El Salvador, Guatemala, Honduras and Nicaragua all recognize September 15 as the date of their independence, while Mexico's independence is celebrated September 16 and Chile celebrates its independence September 18.

    The History of Hispanic Heritage Month

    Hispanic Heritage Month actually began as a commemorative week when it was first introduced in June of 1968 by California Congressman George E. Brown. The push to recognize the contributions of the Latinx community had gained momentum throughout the 1960s when the civil rights movement was at its peak and there was a growing awareness of the United States' multicultural identities.

    On September 17, 1968, Congress passed Public Law 90-48, officially authorizing and requesting the president to issue annual proclamations declaring September 15 and 16 to mark the beginning of National Hispanic Heritage Week and called upon the “people of the United States, especially the educational community, to observe such week with appropriate ceremonies and activities.” President Lyndon B. Johnson issued the first Hispanic Heritage Week presidential proclamation the same day.

    Ways to Celebrate

    King County Libraries offer a number of ways to celebrate along with a reading list of books honoring Hispanic heritage. Explore here: https://kcls.org/blogs/post/celebrate-national-hispanic-heritage-month/


    Source: https://www.hispanicheritagemonth.gov/

  • Welcoming Week Events Start Sept 1 in Sammamish

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    Image Caption

    Through Welcoming Week, organizations and communities bring together neighbors of all backgrounds to build strong connections and affirm the importance of welcoming and inclusive places in achieving collective prosperity.


    Welcoming America is proud to lead the growing network of hosts and partners around the United States and world who strive to make their communities a more welcoming place for all.

    How and where to participate in Sammamish:

    September 1, 2021 4-4:30pm Virtual Storytelling event

    Sammamish Children's Librarian, Miss Sara, will read the book Emily's Idea by Christine Evans and lead songs around Welcoming Week themes. Watch and view this scheduled story time live on Sammamish Library's Facebook page @SammamishLibrary.

    Book description:

    One girl’s idea spreading a message of love, acceptance, and togetherness across the globe Emily’s idea started small. Many beautiful ideas do. She folded, doodled, and snipped. But also, like many ideas, Emily’s small idea grew. This inspiring tale begins when a little girl decides to create a paper chain of dolls. Her idea catches on and spreads far and wide, as children around the world begin to create and share their own. Emily's Idea shows children that their ideas matter—and that they have the power to create positive changes all around them. It also teaches the joy of connecting and befriending those who may look different from ourselves but are more like us than we may think.

    Sept 11-Oct 2: PopUp StoryWalk at Big Rock Park: follow park trail loop with storyboards to learn of Beatrix's adventures from Bea's Bees, written by Katherine Pryor & illustrated by Ellie Peterson

    Beatrix discovers a wild bumblebee nest on her way home from school and finds herself drawn to their busy world. When her bees mysteriously disappear, Bea hatches a plan to bring them back. Can Bea inspire her school and community to save the bees? Bees provide us with valuable resources, and some types of bees are in danger of disappearing forever. But ordinary people (and kids!) can help save them. Filled with fascinating facts about bumblebees and ideas to help preserve their environment, Bea's bees encourages kids to help protect bees and other pollinators.

    September 13 4-4:45pm Eli Rosenblatt Virtual Dance Party - RSVP required

    Join Eli Rosenblatt as he offer a light-hearted, positive message of compassion, understanding and acceptance. This virtual dance party will include a world-music influenced vibe, audience singing and participation, and a little story-telling flavor. Please RSVP ahead of time to receive an email with the Zoom link the day of the event.

    September 17 11:00 a.m. Equitable Economic Development: Embracing Opportunities for Our Region

    Join Eastside For All, the cities of Bellevue, Issaquah, Kirkland, Redmond, Sammamish, King County Library System, Enterprise Welcoming Group, and OneEastside for a virtual Welcoming Week event for community leaders, elected officials, business owners, nonprofit organizations, and others interested in advancing racial equity and inclusion in our local economy. This event is intended to share information and spark action within participants' circles of interest and influence. Click here to register.


    ONGOING

    Rangoli display outside the Sammamish Library

    (Art installation outside library doors)

    A few library staff are skilled in making this sand art mandala from India and have created in the past and are happy to do it again. We don't have an exact for installation date yet, but it can be on display all Welcoming Week.

    Paper dolls inside the Sammamish Library

    (paper doll templates available in the library)

    People are welcome to take home a paper doll to decorate and bring back to add to a paper doll chain around the library to celebrate Welcoming Week.

    Other Welcoming week events around the world: https://welcomingamerica.org/initiatives/welcoming-week/events

  • Celebrating Federal Holiday Juneteenth

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    The freedom of African Americans from slavery in the U.S. in 1865 is celebrated on the holiday Juneteenth on June 19. Juneteenth is made up of the words ‘June’ and ‘nineteenth,’ and it is on this day that Major General Gordon Granger arrived in Texas more than 155 years ago to inform slaves that slavery had been abolished.

    Federal Holiday

    This year on June 17, President Joe Biden signed the Juneteenth National Independence Day Act into law establishing Juneteenth as a federal holiday. Juneteenth is now legally recognized as a federal holiday celebrating the liberation and independence of enslaved people in the United States.

    History of Juneteenth

    According to the official website of the historical event, Juneteenth is ‘the oldest nationally celebrated commemoration of the ending of slavery in the United States.’ Other than marking a pivotal date of significance in American history, Juneteenth also serves as an opportunity for African Americans to cherish their culture and heritage.

    The proclamation declaring the abolishment of slavery was issued by President Abraham Lincoln on January 1, 1863, in the nation’s third year of an ongoing civil war. Known as the Emancipation Proclamation, it declared that ‘all persons held as slaves within any State or designated part of a State […] shall be then, thenceforward, and forever free.’ Granger’s arrival at Texas was to enforce this decree, which had originally gone into effect two years earlier.

    The news had come as a shock to more than 250,000 slaves in Texas who were unaware of it. On June 19, in the city of Galveston, Granger publicly read General Order No. 3, which stated: ‘The people of Texas are informed that, in accordance with a proclamation from the Executive of the United States, all slaves are free.’

    Granger’s arrival with the news stirred the air with jubilance and massive celebrations across the state. A former slave named Felix Haywood gave his recount of the first celebration in 1865 in the book “Lone Star Pasts: Memory and History in Texas” — ‘We was all walkin’ on golden clouds […] Everybody went wild […] We was free. Just like that, we was free.’


    City of Sammamish's Juneteenth Proclamation

    At the City Council meeting on June 15, 2021, Mayor Karen Moran representing the entire City Council proclaimed and signed the Juneteenth Proclamation: https://sammamishwa.civicweb.net/document/59014


    King County Libraries Reading List

    King County Libraries have compiled a resourceful and informative list of books to compliment this year’s celebration of Juneteenth.

    View the list of recommended books from KCLS here:
    https://kcls.bibliocommons.com/list/share/209743155/1191074807


    Community Events Celebrating Juneteenth

    There are many opportunities to celebrate Juneteenth, both virtually and in person. Here are just some of the events in the area.

    Events hosted by the King County Library System

    Saturday, June 19, 10:00 - 11:00 a.m. (Pre-recorded)
    Juneteenth: Journeys of Remembrance Celebration
    https://kcls.bibliocommons.com/events/60b7a0078340a93e00095252

    Saturday, June 19, 1:30 - 2:30 p.m.
    Silver Kite Arts: Celebrating Juneteenth with Poetry
    https://kcls.bibliocommons.com/events/609897382346ceb5183ec6ee

    Community-Hosted Events

    Friday, June 18th, 6:00 - 8:00 p.m.
    Juneteenth Celebration at the Village Green in Issaquah - Global Grub and Groove Series - Come for a celebration of Juneteenth to honor our African American neighbors. Bring your blanket or lawn chairs to the Village Green for live music by Michael Powers and delicious food from C. Davis Texas BBQ! The event is free to attend. Food is for purchase. Village Green: 2550 NE Park Drive Issaquah, WA 98029

    Saturday June 19, 12:00 - 3:00 p.m.
    Redmond - Honoring Juneteenth - EASTSIDE EMBRACE will partner with Eastside For All, Eastside Race & Leadership Coalition, the City of Kirkland, and the City Redmond for a celebration at the Redmond Downtown Park: 16101 NE Redmond Way. Black speakers, DJ, performances, a children's area, art raffle, and honoring local Black high school graduates.

    Saturday, June 19, 2:00 p.m. (virtual event)
    1619: Resistance / Resilience / Remembrance https://3365.blackbaudhosting.com/3365/tickets?tab=2&txobjid=0b0e9ec6-9764-447c-a2e0-410b7d62f802

    Events and Festivities Hosted by the Northwest African American Museum

    June 19, 1:00 - 3:00 p.m.
    Juneteenth Freedom March
    March starts on 22rd & Madison at 1pm; culminates at Jimi Hendrix Park at 3pm.

    June 19, 8:00 p.m.
    'Coded Bias' Film Showing and Discussion
    Outdoors at Kirkland's Northlake Unitarian Universalist Church
    https://www.eventbrite.com/e/coded-bias-film-showing-and-discussion-tickets-158317813843

  • Proud to Honor and Celebrate Pride Month

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    Pride Month is celebrated every June in recognition of the Stonewall Riots on June 28, 1969 in New York City when police raided the Stonewall Inn, a gay club in Greenwich Village, which resulted in bar patrons, staff, and neighborhood residents rioting onto Christopher Street outside. Among the many leaders of the riots was a black, trans, bisexual woman, Marsha P. Johnson, leading the movement to continue over six days with protests and clashes. The message was clear — protestors demanded the establishment of places where LGBT+ people could go and be open about their sexual orientation without fear of arrest.

    Pride Month is largely credited as being started by bisexual activist Brenda Howard. Known as ‘The Mother of Pride,’ Brenda organized Gay Pride Week and the Christopher Street Liberation Day Parade in New York City a year after the Stonewall Riots. This was the catalyst for the formation of similar parades and marches across the world.

    The Rainbow Flag

    Gay politician, Harvey Milk, asked a talented designer friend, Gilbert Baker, to design an all-encompassing symbol to take to San Francisco’s Pride March in 1978.

    Presidential Recognition

    Bill Clinton was the first U.S. President to officially recognize Pride Month in 1999 and 2000. Then, from 2009 to 2016, Barack Obama declared June LGBT Pride Month. In May 2019, Donald Trump recognized Pride Month with a tweet announcing that his administration had launched a global campaign to decriminalize homosexuality.

    This year, a Presidential Proclamation on Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender, and Queer Pride Month was issued.

    On Tuesday, June 1 at Sammamish City Council Regular Meeting a Pride Month Proclamation will be issued.

    For more information on all Eastside cities and communities celebrating diversity, inclusion, and Pride, visit https://www.eastsidepridepnw.com/.

    King County Libraries Reading List

    King County Libraries have compiled a resourceful and informative list of books to compliment this year’s LGBTQ Pride Month.

    View the list of recommended books from KCLS here:
    https://kcls.bibliocommons.com/list/share/708448337/966608307

    A middle school and high school book list for Pride Month featuring LGBTQ+ characters and authors:
    https://kcls.bibliocommons.com/list/share/219431935_redmondteen/1908565129_lgbtq_teen_fiction?page=1

  • National Day of Solidarity Against AAPI Hate

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    As we come to the conclusion of Asian American and Pacific Islander Heritage month, we are reminded of contributions and influence of Asian Americans and Pacific Islander Americans to the history, culture, and achievements in our community and nation. At the same time, we are reminded that we must protect the AAPI community from the increase in hate and violence that has happened across the world over the past year. Join us as we stand in solidarity with the AAPI community.



    For more information on AAPI Heritage Month, go to:
    https://connect.sammamish.us/equity-diversity-inclusion/news_feed/asian-pacific-islander-heritage-month

  • Honoring Asian American and Pacific Islander Heritage Month

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    Join us during the month of May as we recognize and honor Asian American and Pacific Islander Heritage Month. This month we encourage everyone to pause and recognize the contributions and influence of Asian Americans and Pacific Islander Americans to the history, culture, and achievements of the United States.

    History of Asian Pacific Islander Heritage Month

    A former congressional staffer in the 1970s, Jeanie Jew, first approached the idea of designating a month to recognize Asian Pacific Americans, following the bicentennial celebrations. In June 1977, a United States House of Representatives resolution was introduced to proclaim the first ten days of May as Asian-Pacific Heritage Week. A similar bill was introduced in the Senate a month later.

    The proposed resolutions sought that May be designated for two reasons. For on May 7, 1843, the first Japanese immigrant arrived in the United States. More than two decades later, on May 10, 1869, the First Transcontinental Railroad was completed and Chinese labor was used to construct the railroad.

    President Jimmy Carter signed a joint resolution for the celebration on October 5, 1978.


    View a calendar of local virtual events hosted by the Seattle Center and national events hosted by Library of Congress.

    PBS Programming

    KCTS9 is offering a special program lineup in celebrating of Asian American and Pacific Islander Heritage Month. Click here to view the schedule.

    King County Libraries Reading List

    King County Libraries have compiled a resourceful and informative list of books to compliment this year’s Asian American and Pacific Islander Heritage Month.

    View the list of recommended books from KCLS here: https://kcls.bibliocommons.com/list/share/209743155/1848190189

  • April is National Volunteer Month

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    National Volunteer Month is observed each year during the month of April. It’s a month dedicated to promoting and celebrating volunteerism. This is a great time to recognize volunteer opportunities helping to ensure that our communities are thriving and initiatives supporting diversity, equality and inclusion are in the forefront.

    Celebrate Volunteerism and Get Involved

    Now more than ever, people helping others is worth celebrating. Volunteers make so much possible and deserve our appreciation. Each week, we will spotlight a volunteer opportunity on the City’s Facebook, Twitter and Instagram pages. Make sure to also check the Volunteer Opportunities tab on the City's Equity, Diversity and Inclusion page.

    How did National Volunteer Month start?

    National Volunteer Month first started as a week-long observation in 1974 and has continued to grow to now be a month-long celebration. In his proclamation declaring National Volunteer Week, President Richard Nixon urged all Americans to observe the week by seeking out a volunteer opportunity. He also called upon all communities to “recognize volunteers by observing the week with special ceremonies to honor those who have given countless hours for the betterment of our communities and the American way of life.” Since then, individuals, offices, schools, and teams volunteer their time during the month of April to make their communities better.

  • March is Women's History Month

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    At the March 2, 2021 Sammamish City Council Meeting, Mayor Karen Moran signed the proclamation declaring March as Women's History Month. View the proclamation here: Women's History Month Proclamation.


    History of Women's History Month

    Every year, March is designated Women’s History Month by Presidential proclamation. The month is set aside to honor women’s contributions in American history.


    Did You Know? Women’s History Month started as Women’s History Week

    Women’s History Month began as a local celebration in Santa Rosa, California. The Education Task Force of the Sonoma County (California) Commission on the Status of Women planned and executed a “Women’s History Week” celebration in 1978. The organizers selected the week of March 8 to correspond with International Women’s Day. The movement spread across the country as other communities initiated their own Women’s History Week celebrations the following year.

    In March 1987, Congress passed Public Law 100-9, designating March as “Women’s History Month.” Between 1988 and 1994, Congress passed additional resolutions requesting and authorizing the President to proclaim March of each year as Women’s History Month. Since 1995, each president has issued an annual proclamations designating the month of March as “Women’s History Month.”

    Read more at https://www.womenshistory.org/.


    King County Libraries Reading List
    King County Libraries have compiled a resourceful and informative list of books to recognize and honor Women’s History Month.

    View the list of recommended books from KCLS here:
    https://kcls.bibliocommons.com/list/share/209743155/860842487


    Women of Team Sammamish
    We want to take this month and honor women making a difference with the City of Sammamish, Sammamish Police Department and Eastside Fire and Rescue. Each day during the month of March, we will spotlight a woman from Team Sammamish on the City’s Facebook, Twitter and Instagram pages.

  • Celebrating and Honoring Black History Month

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    In recognition of the first day of Black History Month, The City of Sammamish has proclaimed the month of February as a month to recognize and honor Black History. The City’s Equity, Diversity and Inclusion page will be updated throughout the month with virtually events hosted by the Northwest African American Museum and informative resources by King County Libraries.

    Read the City of Sammamish’s Black History Month Proclamation: https://sammamishwa.civicweb.net/document/53704

    Northwest African American Museum
    The Northwest African American Museum invites you to celebrate Black History Month virtually this year with a full lineup of events.

    View a calendar of virtual events hosted by the NAAM here: https://www.naamnw.org/events

    King County Libraries Reading List
    King County Libraries have compiled a resourceful and informative list of books to compliment this year’s theme "The Black Family: Representation, Identity and Diversity" by the Association for the Study of African American Life and History.

    View the list of recommended books from KCLS here: https://kcls.bibliocommons.com/list/share/209743155/805471157

  • International Holocaust Remembrance Day

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    The United Nations General Assembly designated January 27—the anniversary of the liberation of Auschwitz-Birkenau—as International Holocaust Remembrance Day.

    On this annual day of commemoration, the UN urges every member state to honor the six million Jewish victims of the Holocaust and millions of other victims of Nazism and to develop educational programs to help prevent future genocides.

    Join the Conversation
    Share your reflections about International Holocaust Remembrance Day on social media using #WeRemember.

    The King County Library offers a list of books to explore in recognition of International Holocaust Remembrance Day: https://kcls.bibliocommons.com/list/share/388016847/1128778757