Help Keep Our Water Clean!

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The City of Sammamish is committed to keeping our water clean!

And you can help ...

To spread awareness and engage our community in helping to Keep Sammamish Clean, we are continuing the rainwater pollution prevention campaign. Together, we can protect Lake Sammamish, our local mascot “the little red fish” – kokanee salmon, and other native species! You can help to Keep Sammamish Clean by taking part in community challenges or activities, encouraging others to participate, and adopt new techniques for rainwater pollution prevention. We would like to learn more about pet waste and yard care in our community, please

The City of Sammamish is committed to keeping our water clean!

And you can help ...

To spread awareness and engage our community in helping to Keep Sammamish Clean, we are continuing the rainwater pollution prevention campaign. Together, we can protect Lake Sammamish, our local mascot “the little red fish” – kokanee salmon, and other native species! You can help to Keep Sammamish Clean by taking part in community challenges or activities, encouraging others to participate, and adopt new techniques for rainwater pollution prevention. We would like to learn more about pet waste and yard care in our community, please help us by taking this quick survey!

With many of us spending more time where we live, our pets and plants are reaping the benefits. The summer is a great time to make choices that minimize rainwater pollution while enjoying time outside. Pollutants can be picked up by rainwater as it flows across the surface of the Earth. Pollutants include chemicals from yards or gardens and even pet waste! These pollutants are NOT removed from rainwater before it goes into storm drains. This means kokanee salmon and other aquatic life can be harmed since storm drains lead to local creeks, wetlands, and lakes, including Lake Sammamish.

When we take our furry friends for a walk, spend time tending a garden, or luxuriate in the feel of grass on our feet, we can protect our local waterways. Check out our easy rainwater pollution prevention tips below!

Best Management Practices for Pet Waste and Yard Care



Pet Waste

Did you know… that a single gram of pet waste contains, on average, 23 million fecal coliform bacteria? Pet waste also includes harmful organisms like Giardia and roundworms that can be transmitted to people if not properly cleaned up and placed into a trash container. When pet waste is washed into local waterways by rainwater, the local aquatic life is at risk—including our friend the kokanee salmon!

How can we… keep pet waste out of the rainwater and local waterways? If you need a little inspiration, check out this Dog Doogity music video featuring Martin Luther. Generally, cleaning up and disposing of pet waste properly is the best method of prevention.

Tips for Managing Pet Waste:

  1. Scoop it, bag it, trash it! Let this simple saying inspire you to prevent millions of harmful bacteria from entering Lake Sammamish. Remember to always tie the bag off and place it into a trash container! If you are not sure where there might be a trash container, consider walking around your neighborhood or local park to locate containers when you are not with your pet.
  2. Pick up your pet’s waste, even in your own yard. Rainwater gathers pollutants from all over the watershed as it travels to the nearest storm drain or body of water, this includes your yard.
  3. Remember your bags. Reuse plastic bags from bread or newspapers. You can tie bags to your pet’s leash if you do not have another way to carry them while walking. If you happen to forget your bags, look around for pet waste stations.


Yard and Garden Care

Yards and gardens provide a peaceful release for some and delicious food for others. No matter how you interact with your landscape, practicing natural yard and garden care can prevent rainwater pollution. Harmful yard and garden products end up in local waterways via rainwater and can negatively impact wildlife. Fortunately, yard care that works for you and the environment exists! Learn more from the tips and resources below.

Tips and Resources for Yard and Garden Care:

  1. Consider planting native species that are better equipped to resist pests and disease reducing the need for pesticides. Check out the Northwest Native Plant Guide!
  2. Pull weeds by hand or with tools rather than using a weed and feed product on your whole yard. If you do decide to use a weed killer, wear gloves and spray just the weed when it is not windy or expected to rain. Not sure if you have a weed? Check out the Noxious Weeds in King County webpage for help.
  3. Want to do something but not sure where to start? Connect with the Garden Hotline—they offer FREE services to home gardeners and landscape professionals throughout King County. They can help answer questions about safer yard and garden practices.

Remember: Only Rain Down the Storm Drain!