Help Keep Our Water Clean!

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The City of Sammamish is committed to keeping our water clean!

And you can help ...

To spread awareness and engage our community in helping to Keep Sammamish Clean, we are continuing the rainwater pollution prevention campaign. Together, we can protect Lake Sammamish, our local mascot “the little red fish” – kokanee salmon, and other native species! You can help to Keep Sammamish Clean by taking part in community challenges or activities, encouraging others to participate, and adopt new techniques for rainwater pollution prevention. We would like to learn more about how you prevent litter and reduce waste, please take this quick survey!

Litter, a preventable pollutant

Lake Sammamish is special. If you visit, you might see a Great Blue Heron or kokanee salmon. As the sixth-largest lake in Washington state, it is an important ecosystem for human and nonhuman communities alike. The city of Sammamish is in the watershed for Lake Sammamish meaning community members can take direct action for its protection.

Beginning in 1968, people took action to protect Lake Sammamish by diverting sewage from the lake. This vastly improved water quality and clarity. Over the next 30 years, King County expanded into suburban areas which brought more roads and housing development. A changed landscape meant the "quality, quantity, and timing of water flows from the watershed" impacted Lake Sammamish through nonpoint sources of pollution. Nonpoint sources of pollution like stormwater runoff, septic tanks, or construction sites caused increased levels of phosphorous in Lake Sammamish. Why is phosphorous a big deal? It can reduce the amount of dissolved oxygen in the water, make it difficult for fish and aquatic animals to survive.

The Lake Sammamish Initiative went into place in August 1995 to prevent further degradation of water quality. Later, in 2007, the Lake Sammamish Kokanee Work Group was organized to identify why kokanee salmon populations were declining. This group recommended actions for the protection of kokanee salmon.

Today, people like you can continue to protect Lake Sammamish and kokanee salmon! Litter is a type of pollution that our communities can control and prevent! See some tips for litter prevention and waste reduction below. If you are a student (or have a student in your life) this is a great workbook about Kokanee salmon from the Snoqualmie Tribe.

Emergency action to prevent the possible extinction of native kokanee salmon


Tips for litter prevention and waste reduction:

The City of Sammamish is committed to keeping our water clean!

And you can help ...

To spread awareness and engage our community in helping to Keep Sammamish Clean, we are continuing the rainwater pollution prevention campaign. Together, we can protect Lake Sammamish, our local mascot “the little red fish” – kokanee salmon, and other native species! You can help to Keep Sammamish Clean by taking part in community challenges or activities, encouraging others to participate, and adopt new techniques for rainwater pollution prevention. We would like to learn more about how you prevent litter and reduce waste, please take this quick survey!

Litter, a preventable pollutant

Lake Sammamish is special. If you visit, you might see a Great Blue Heron or kokanee salmon. As the sixth-largest lake in Washington state, it is an important ecosystem for human and nonhuman communities alike. The city of Sammamish is in the watershed for Lake Sammamish meaning community members can take direct action for its protection.

Beginning in 1968, people took action to protect Lake Sammamish by diverting sewage from the lake. This vastly improved water quality and clarity. Over the next 30 years, King County expanded into suburban areas which brought more roads and housing development. A changed landscape meant the "quality, quantity, and timing of water flows from the watershed" impacted Lake Sammamish through nonpoint sources of pollution. Nonpoint sources of pollution like stormwater runoff, septic tanks, or construction sites caused increased levels of phosphorous in Lake Sammamish. Why is phosphorous a big deal? It can reduce the amount of dissolved oxygen in the water, make it difficult for fish and aquatic animals to survive.

The Lake Sammamish Initiative went into place in August 1995 to prevent further degradation of water quality. Later, in 2007, the Lake Sammamish Kokanee Work Group was organized to identify why kokanee salmon populations were declining. This group recommended actions for the protection of kokanee salmon.

Today, people like you can continue to protect Lake Sammamish and kokanee salmon! Litter is a type of pollution that our communities can control and prevent! See some tips for litter prevention and waste reduction below. If you are a student (or have a student in your life) this is a great workbook about Kokanee salmon from the Snoqualmie Tribe.

Emergency action to prevent the possible extinction of native kokanee salmon


Tips for litter prevention and waste reduction:

Page last updated: 31 December 2020, 13:11