SE 8th St & 218th Ave Corridor Improvement Study

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Street-level visualization of the alternative concept design, looking south on 216th Ave NE. The visualization shows a two-lane road with bike lanes on both sides, and people walking on a sidewalk on the east side of 216th Ave NE. There are light poles located on the landscape buffer between the sidewalk and bike lane on the east side.



What's the latest?

  • The City of Sammamish is studying the existing conditions and future needs for people walking, biking, driving, and living on the SE 8th St & 218th Ave roadway corridors. (See map below.)
  • Thanks to the over 160 people who took our online survey through May 11 about the alternative design concept! Your ideas will help us refine the alternative concept to create a preferred concept.
  • Sign up for email updates to stay tuned for the preferred concept and a summary of what we heard. In the meantime, check out the draft alternative concept design, below.
  • Questions? Feel free to leave a question for us in the Q&A tab, below, or contact Jim Grueber, Senior Project Engineer, at jgrueber@sammamish.us, (425) 295-0566.

如需将网站内容翻译为简体中文,点击右上方的“Select Language”。您可以使用 Google Translate,将本网站翻译成超过 100 种语言。 要了解本计划的更多信息,请致电 (425) 295-0566

Map showing the SE 8th St. & 218th Ave. Corridor

Map of the SE 8th St & 218th Ave Corridor

Project goals:

Develop a roadway plan that aligns with the City’s commitment to enhance quality of life by analyzing improvements along the corridor to enhance safety and accommodate increased use, while protecting environmentally sensitive areas such as streams and wetlands.

Alternative design concept:

  • Using community input and results from traffic studies, we developed an alternative concept design to the standard design to balance improvement priorities with minimizing adverse impacts.
  • Thanks to all those who took our online survey about the alternative design concept through May 11! Your input will help us refine the alternative to include the right balance of features in the preferred design concept.
  • Sign up for email updates to stay tuned for the preferred concept and a summary of what we heard.
  • In the meantime, take a closer look at the draft alternative design concept for 218th Ave and SE 8th St.

 Alternative concept design cross section shows a two-lane road with bike lanes on both sides of the street and a sidewalk with landscape buffer on the right side.

Alternative concept design, cross-section


Project prioritiesDesign features
More transportation options
Two through lanes, no center turn lane
Speed limit of 25 miles per hour
Sidewalk with landscape buffer on the north side of 8th and east side of 216th / 217th / 218th
ADA-compliant sidewalks, curb ramps, and street crossings
Designated bike lanes on each side of the road
Safety improvements
Improved street lighting
Paint lines and symbols on the road
Improved sight lines on hills and at intersections
Roundabouts throughout the corridor for traffic calming and side-street access
Environmental preservation
Reduces need to acquire right-of-way, minimizing property impacts
Reduces regrading, minimizing impact to sensitive areas and trees

Alternative design concept features


Street-level visualization of the alternative concept design, looking west on SE 8th street. The visualization shows a two-lane road with bike lanes on both sides, and people walking on a sidewalk on the right side of the road. There is a raised center median visible at the top of the road, near the intersection of 212th Ave SE.SE 8th St alternative concept design, street-level visualization


Street-level visualization of the alternative concept design, looking south on 216th Ave NE. The visualization shows a two-lane road with bike lanes on both sides, and people walking on a sidewalk on the east side of 216th Ave NE. There are light poles located on the landscape buffer between the sidewalk and bike lane on the east side.

216th Ave NE alternative concept design, street-level visualization

The project area today:

SE 8th St today is a two-lane road with narrow shoulders and open ditches without sidewalks, landscape buffers, or designated bike lanes.

Section of SE 8th St as it exists today, as a two-lane road with double yellow lines and grass and power lines on either side.

SE 8th St today


218th Ave SE/NE is a two-lane road with a mix of narrow shoulders and open ditches for drainage, as well as segmented “half street” improvements built by new housing developments.

Section of 218th Ave SE as it exists today, as a two-lane road with grass on the left side and sidewalk on the right side bordering a neighborhood development

"Half-street" improvement on 218th Ave SE today


217th/216th Ave NE, north of Main St, is a two-lane road with speed humps, gravel shoulders, and open ditches without sidewalks, landscape buffers, or designated bike lanes.

Section of 216th Ave NE as it exists today, as a two-lane road with speed bumps and gravel shoulders

216th Ave NE today

Why are we doing a corridor study now?

Our community is growing, and more people are traveling along the corridor in vehicles, on bicycles, and by foot. Nearby changes include:

  • Residential developments
  • New community parks
  • Long-planned Town Center

This study helps us set priorities and develop a practical plan and budget to design a future corridor that meets the needs of our growing community.

What we’ve heard from the community:

Fall 2019 Community Outreach

In fall 2019, the City gathered public input online to identify concerns about the existing roadway and envision a better corridor for the future. The online participation site garnered:

  • Nearly 75 pins on the interactive map, indicating what people like and the concerns they have about the corridor as it is today
  • Over 150 responses to the community survey

Bar graph that shows results from the City’s online survey, open to the public fall 2019. The graph represents the potential corridor improvements in order of importance to the community, as ranked by survey respondents. Adding sidewalks is the highest-ranked improvement, followed by improving overall safety for all users. The third highest-ranked improvement is preserving wetlands along the corridor. The fourth-highest is adding designated bicycle lanes. The fifth-highest is improving sight for motorized vehicles. The sixth-highest is reducing motorized vehicle speeds. The improvement that ranked lowest in importance to the community is reducing travel times for motorized vehicles.

We learned that most of the community’s priorities for corridor improvements fall into three main categories:

  1. More transportation options
    • Designated space for pedestrians, bicyclists, and drivers
  2. Safety needs
    • Better sight visibility at intersections and on hills
    • New street lighting for nighttime visibility
    • Safer intersections for pedestrians
  3. Environmental preservation
    • Preserve trees, wetlands, and the natural character along the corridor

Download the summary of results from this earlier engagement.


Spring 2020 Community Outreach

  • In spring 2020, we asked the community for feedback on our alternative concept design.
  • Though our public meeting was cancelled due to COVID-19, we extended the deadline for our online survey so more people could participate online. You may have seen our flier on Peachjar, or received a postcard encouraging you to share your thoughts via our online survey.
  • Thanks to the over 160 people who took our online survey! Your ideas will help us refine the alternative concept to create a preferred concept.
  • Sign up for email updates to stay tuned for the preferred concept and a summary of what we heard. In the meantime, learn more about the draft alternative design concept, below.

What we’ve found from traffic studies:

  • We modeled future traffic and learned that two lanes will adequately accommodate future traffic in the corridor
  • We reviewed five years of history for vehicle collision reports, finding a relatively low number of crashes for its size and use patterns
  • We found that either stop signs or roundabouts will meet the City's standards for future service at intersections in the corridor

Comparing the standard design to the alternative concept:

We studied the fit of the City’s standard design for roadways like this corridor, called a Collector Arterial. In this corridor, the standard design would cause greater property and environmental impacts than the alternative design, and its three-lane configuration would not be necessary to accommodate future traffic.

Check out the table below to compare the standard and the alternative design.

Project priorityDesign featuresStandard designAlternative concept
More transportation options
New sidewalksSidewalks on both sides of the roadwaySidewalk on one side of the roadway
ADA-compliant sidewalks, curb ramps, and street crossingsYes

Yes

Designated bike lanes on each side of the roadYes

Yes

Accomodates future traffic needs (2035 full land use)Yes

Yes

Safety improvements
Improved street lightingYes

Yes

Paint lines and symbols on the roadYes

Yes

Improved sight lines on hills and at intersectionsYes

Yes

Roundabouts throughout the corridor for traffic calmingNoYes

Environmental preservation
Right-of-way requirements for roadway footprintRequires greater property acquisition for right-of-wayMinimizes need to acquire property for right-of-way
Grading requirementsCauses greater impact to wetlands, adjacent properties, and treesMinimizes impact to sensitive areas and trees




What's the latest?

  • The City of Sammamish is studying the existing conditions and future needs for people walking, biking, driving, and living on the SE 8th St & 218th Ave roadway corridors. (See map below.)
  • Thanks to the over 160 people who took our online survey through May 11 about the alternative design concept! Your ideas will help us refine the alternative concept to create a preferred concept.
  • Sign up for email updates to stay tuned for the preferred concept and a summary of what we heard. In the meantime, check out the draft alternative concept design, below.
  • Questions? Feel free to leave a question for us in the Q&A tab, below, or contact Jim Grueber, Senior Project Engineer, at jgrueber@sammamish.us, (425) 295-0566.

如需将网站内容翻译为简体中文,点击右上方的“Select Language”。您可以使用 Google Translate,将本网站翻译成超过 100 种语言。 要了解本计划的更多信息,请致电 (425) 295-0566

Map showing the SE 8th St. & 218th Ave. Corridor

Map of the SE 8th St & 218th Ave Corridor

Project goals:

Develop a roadway plan that aligns with the City’s commitment to enhance quality of life by analyzing improvements along the corridor to enhance safety and accommodate increased use, while protecting environmentally sensitive areas such as streams and wetlands.

Alternative design concept:

  • Using community input and results from traffic studies, we developed an alternative concept design to the standard design to balance improvement priorities with minimizing adverse impacts.
  • Thanks to all those who took our online survey about the alternative design concept through May 11! Your input will help us refine the alternative to include the right balance of features in the preferred design concept.
  • Sign up for email updates to stay tuned for the preferred concept and a summary of what we heard.
  • In the meantime, take a closer look at the draft alternative design concept for 218th Ave and SE 8th St.

 Alternative concept design cross section shows a two-lane road with bike lanes on both sides of the street and a sidewalk with landscape buffer on the right side.

Alternative concept design, cross-section


Project prioritiesDesign features
More transportation options
Two through lanes, no center turn lane
Speed limit of 25 miles per hour
Sidewalk with landscape buffer on the north side of 8th and east side of 216th / 217th / 218th
ADA-compliant sidewalks, curb ramps, and street crossings
Designated bike lanes on each side of the road
Safety improvements
Improved street lighting
Paint lines and symbols on the road
Improved sight lines on hills and at intersections
Roundabouts throughout the corridor for traffic calming and side-street access
Environmental preservation
Reduces need to acquire right-of-way, minimizing property impacts
Reduces regrading, minimizing impact to sensitive areas and trees

Alternative design concept features


Street-level visualization of the alternative concept design, looking west on SE 8th street. The visualization shows a two-lane road with bike lanes on both sides, and people walking on a sidewalk on the right side of the road. There is a raised center median visible at the top of the road, near the intersection of 212th Ave SE.SE 8th St alternative concept design, street-level visualization


Street-level visualization of the alternative concept design, looking south on 216th Ave NE. The visualization shows a two-lane road with bike lanes on both sides, and people walking on a sidewalk on the east side of 216th Ave NE. There are light poles located on the landscape buffer between the sidewalk and bike lane on the east side.

216th Ave NE alternative concept design, street-level visualization

The project area today:

SE 8th St today is a two-lane road with narrow shoulders and open ditches without sidewalks, landscape buffers, or designated bike lanes.

Section of SE 8th St as it exists today, as a two-lane road with double yellow lines and grass and power lines on either side.

SE 8th St today


218th Ave SE/NE is a two-lane road with a mix of narrow shoulders and open ditches for drainage, as well as segmented “half street” improvements built by new housing developments.

Section of 218th Ave SE as it exists today, as a two-lane road with grass on the left side and sidewalk on the right side bordering a neighborhood development

"Half-street" improvement on 218th Ave SE today


217th/216th Ave NE, north of Main St, is a two-lane road with speed humps, gravel shoulders, and open ditches without sidewalks, landscape buffers, or designated bike lanes.

Section of 216th Ave NE as it exists today, as a two-lane road with speed bumps and gravel shoulders

216th Ave NE today

Why are we doing a corridor study now?

Our community is growing, and more people are traveling along the corridor in vehicles, on bicycles, and by foot. Nearby changes include:

  • Residential developments
  • New community parks
  • Long-planned Town Center

This study helps us set priorities and develop a practical plan and budget to design a future corridor that meets the needs of our growing community.

What we’ve heard from the community:

Fall 2019 Community Outreach

In fall 2019, the City gathered public input online to identify concerns about the existing roadway and envision a better corridor for the future. The online participation site garnered:

  • Nearly 75 pins on the interactive map, indicating what people like and the concerns they have about the corridor as it is today
  • Over 150 responses to the community survey

Bar graph that shows results from the City’s online survey, open to the public fall 2019. The graph represents the potential corridor improvements in order of importance to the community, as ranked by survey respondents. Adding sidewalks is the highest-ranked improvement, followed by improving overall safety for all users. The third highest-ranked improvement is preserving wetlands along the corridor. The fourth-highest is adding designated bicycle lanes. The fifth-highest is improving sight for motorized vehicles. The sixth-highest is reducing motorized vehicle speeds. The improvement that ranked lowest in importance to the community is reducing travel times for motorized vehicles.

We learned that most of the community’s priorities for corridor improvements fall into three main categories:

  1. More transportation options
    • Designated space for pedestrians, bicyclists, and drivers
  2. Safety needs
    • Better sight visibility at intersections and on hills
    • New street lighting for nighttime visibility
    • Safer intersections for pedestrians
  3. Environmental preservation
    • Preserve trees, wetlands, and the natural character along the corridor

Download the summary of results from this earlier engagement.


Spring 2020 Community Outreach

  • In spring 2020, we asked the community for feedback on our alternative concept design.
  • Though our public meeting was cancelled due to COVID-19, we extended the deadline for our online survey so more people could participate online. You may have seen our flier on Peachjar, or received a postcard encouraging you to share your thoughts via our online survey.
  • Thanks to the over 160 people who took our online survey! Your ideas will help us refine the alternative concept to create a preferred concept.
  • Sign up for email updates to stay tuned for the preferred concept and a summary of what we heard. In the meantime, learn more about the draft alternative design concept, below.

What we’ve found from traffic studies:

  • We modeled future traffic and learned that two lanes will adequately accommodate future traffic in the corridor
  • We reviewed five years of history for vehicle collision reports, finding a relatively low number of crashes for its size and use patterns
  • We found that either stop signs or roundabouts will meet the City's standards for future service at intersections in the corridor

Comparing the standard design to the alternative concept:

We studied the fit of the City’s standard design for roadways like this corridor, called a Collector Arterial. In this corridor, the standard design would cause greater property and environmental impacts than the alternative design, and its three-lane configuration would not be necessary to accommodate future traffic.

Check out the table below to compare the standard and the alternative design.

Project priorityDesign featuresStandard designAlternative concept
More transportation options
New sidewalksSidewalks on both sides of the roadwaySidewalk on one side of the roadway
ADA-compliant sidewalks, curb ramps, and street crossingsYes

Yes

Designated bike lanes on each side of the roadYes

Yes

Accomodates future traffic needs (2035 full land use)Yes

Yes

Safety improvements
Improved street lightingYes

Yes

Paint lines and symbols on the roadYes

Yes

Improved sight lines on hills and at intersectionsYes

Yes

Roundabouts throughout the corridor for traffic calmingNoYes

Environmental preservation
Right-of-way requirements for roadway footprintRequires greater property acquisition for right-of-wayMinimizes need to acquire property for right-of-way
Grading requirementsCauses greater impact to wetlands, adjacent properties, and treesMinimizes impact to sensitive areas and trees


  • What we heard from the community, fall 2019

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    5 months ago
    Thank you to everyone who contributed to this corridor study by participating in our interactive map and community survey, fall 2019! Your valuable input helps us conceptualize a future roadway plan to balance travel mobility and safety needs, while minimizing environmental impacts.

    This corridor is between 212th Avenue SE and Inglewood Hill Rd, and includes the following streets:
    • SE 8th Street,
    • 218th Avenue SE & NE
    • 217th Avenue NE
    • 216th Avenue NE

    In our outreach last fall, we learned that the community’s top priorities for corridor improvements include:
    • Safety for people walking, biking, and driving through the corridor
    • ...

    Thank you to everyone who contributed to this corridor study by participating in our interactive map and community survey, fall 2019! Your valuable input helps us conceptualize a future roadway plan to balance travel mobility and safety needs, while minimizing environmental impacts.

    This corridor is between 212th Avenue SE and Inglewood Hill Rd, and includes the following streets:

    • SE 8th Street,
    • 218th Avenue SE & NE
    • 217th Avenue NE
    • 216th Avenue NE

    In our outreach last fall, we learned that the community’s top priorities for corridor improvements include:

    • Safety for people walking, biking, and driving through the corridor
    • Preservation of the environment and corridor character

    Download the summary of the results from our online survey and interactive map, and mark your calendars for these upcoming opportunities to get involved:

    • Share your thoughts to refine the conceptual design at our public meeting the evening of Thursday, March 12, at Sammamish City Hall, 801 228th Ave SE.
    • Can’t make the meeting? No worries. You’ll be able to visit our website to view the conceptual design and take the online survey.
    • Sign up for email updates on the project homepage to stay in the loop about opportunities to participate in person and online.

    For more information,
    contact Jim Grueber, Senior Project Engineer, at: jgrueber@sammamish.us, (425) 295-0566

    Image below: Graph depicting results from the community survey, fall 2019. This graph shows potential corridor improvements in order of perceived importance to survey respondents. View the full summary of the results.


  • Survey and interactive map now closed – thank you for participating!

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    8 months ago

    Thank you to all those who voiced your ideas on our interactive map and community survey from October 18 through November 22! Your input will help us develop a conceptual roadway "footprint" that will be used to define the future design plan and project funding needs.

    Community outreach and participation:

    You may have received our postcard about the project, checked out our Facebook posts, or saw our flier on “Peachjar” digital bulletin boards for local school districts. Thanks for helping us spread the word! We’re grateful to report that nearly 75 of you provided input on our interactive...

    Thank you to all those who voiced your ideas on our interactive map and community survey from October 18 through November 22! Your input will help us develop a conceptual roadway "footprint" that will be used to define the future design plan and project funding needs.

    Community outreach and participation:

    You may have received our postcard about the project, checked out our Facebook posts, or saw our flier on “Peachjar” digital bulletin boards for local school districts. Thanks for helping us spread the word! We’re grateful to report that nearly 75 of you provided input on our interactive map and we received over 150 responses to our community survey. Your responses will help us identify concerns about the existing roadway and envision a better corridor for the future.

    Stay tuned to this page, as we'll soon be sharing a summary of what we heard from you. In the meantime, check out the pins submitted to our interactive map.

    Next steps:

    Our design team is going to be busy the next few months, developing concepts based on technical findings and your input. We’ll share these concepts with you and ask for your feedback at a public meeting next spring. If you haven’t already, subscribe for email updates to stay in the loop about this upcoming opportunity to come talk with us, look over design concepts, and share your ideas.

    Questions?

    Please contact Jim Grueber, Senior Project Engineer, at: jgrueber@sammamish.us, (425) 295-056


    SE 8th St & 218th Ave Corridor Improvement Study Flier: