Transportation Master Plan

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Connect Sammamish - Our TMP

*Update as of June 2020: The City's Transportation Master Plan effort is currently on hold, pending resolution of the City's compliance effort with the Growth Management Hearings Board's Order remanding the City's segments and corridors level of service (LOS) standards for compliance with the Growth Management Act (GMA) and the State Environmental Policy Act (SEPA). Please check in on the status of this project by visiting this page in the future.

Improving How You Get Around Town

The City is developing its first Transportation Master Plan (TMP) which will include both short- and long-range strategies leading to the development of a multimodal transportation system to help achieve the City’s transportation vision and goals over the next 20 years.

The TMP will provide a strategic framework and prioritized investments to help improve how we get around town. In doing so, there are several issues and needs to consider when deciding how and where to spend limited resources. These include:

  • Addressing the challenges of growth on the transportation network;
  • Promoting safety for all users;
  • Developing a long-term, sustainable financing plan;
  • Finding a way to achieve a connected road network while maintaining neighborhood character;
  • Integrating new technologies; and
  • Finding ways to partner with transit agencies, school districts, regional partners, and others to meet the community’s most pressing transportation-related needs.

Draft TMP Now Available!

The TMP Project Team has developed a draft TMP, which is the culmination of extensive community outreach, significant technical data collection and analyses, and City Council input beginning in spring 2017. The Draft TMP documents the community’s goals and priorities for the City’s transportation network. It addresses Sammamish's transportation challenges now and into the future by identifying issues and optimizing multimodal transportation investments in the City. City Council and community input on the Draft TMP will be reviewed and incorporated into a revised TMP, which will be the subject of a future online open house on this webpage in the tools below.

*Update as of June 2020: The City's Transportation Master Plan effort is currently on hold, pending resolution of the City's compliance effort with the Growth Management Hearings Board's Order remanding the City's segments and corridors level of service (LOS) standards for compliance with the Growth Management Act (GMA) and the State Environmental Policy Act (SEPA). Please check in on the status of this project by visiting this page in the future.

Improving How You Get Around Town

The City is developing its first Transportation Master Plan (TMP) which will include both short- and long-range strategies leading to the development of a multimodal transportation system to help achieve the City’s transportation vision and goals over the next 20 years.

The TMP will provide a strategic framework and prioritized investments to help improve how we get around town. In doing so, there are several issues and needs to consider when deciding how and where to spend limited resources. These include:

  • Addressing the challenges of growth on the transportation network;
  • Promoting safety for all users;
  • Developing a long-term, sustainable financing plan;
  • Finding a way to achieve a connected road network while maintaining neighborhood character;
  • Integrating new technologies; and
  • Finding ways to partner with transit agencies, school districts, regional partners, and others to meet the community’s most pressing transportation-related needs.

Draft TMP Now Available!

The TMP Project Team has developed a draft TMP, which is the culmination of extensive community outreach, significant technical data collection and analyses, and City Council input beginning in spring 2017. The Draft TMP documents the community’s goals and priorities for the City’s transportation network. It addresses Sammamish's transportation challenges now and into the future by identifying issues and optimizing multimodal transportation investments in the City. City Council and community input on the Draft TMP will be reviewed and incorporated into a revised TMP, which will be the subject of a future online open house on this webpage in the tools below.

Have you been hearing a lot about the TMP, but are unsure what it's about?  Get an answer here!

Q&A

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    This question was asked on the "About" page by krcx on 5/9/20: It seems that as SE 4th street is being finished it’s extremely narrow. Will there be any bike lanes?

    5 months ago

    Hello and thank you for the question.  We believe that this question was meant for the TMP project page, so we will move it to that page.  However, the answer is also posted below: 

    Bike lanes on SE 4th Street are part of the project.  It does seem quite narrow right now.  There will be more space once all of the pavement is placed and is level with the curbs.  The roadway is the City's standard width, however the raised center median gives the perception of narrowing the roadway and is a tactic used by traffic engineers to encourage driver attention and proper travel speeds.

    For additional information on this project, please visit: https://www.sammamish.us/government/departments/public-works/current-projects/se-4th-improvements/(External link) 

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    This question was asked on the "About" page by lscott on 10/18/19: When a major connector road (e.g. Issaquah Fall City Rd) is going to be shut down for a significant period of time (9+ months) the city needs to work with the schools and private businesses that will be most definitely effected by this detour to find solutions to moving a significant number of people through that same traffic pattern during the day. Is there anything the city is willing to do to reduce the number of cars going through the detour (i.e., provide a shuttle from one side of the closure to the other)? It just seems that funneling all of that traffic through a significant detour around it is going to cause major delays everywhere! A longer project with less overall impact would be a better option. We would love to hear how the city is working to provide options to commuters impacted by this impending road closure.

    11 months ago

    While the closure of Issaquah-Fall City Road is impactful, it is unavoidable.  The City of Sammamish is committed to making it as short as possible.  The City has been working with residents and community organizations to communicate the closure well in advance to allow residents the ability to make alternative plans for the closure.  The City, however, is very limited in what it can provide in terms of alternative transportation, as it is not a transit agency.  Similarly, King County Metro does not typically provide mitigation for construction projects.  While Metro has added bus service to critical routes when something like the Seattle Viaduct closure happens, they have not ventured into areas where there are no current bus routes.  An option for certain local trips is Sammamish Community Ride, an alternative transit service that began in June of this year.  See: https://www.kingcounty.gov/depts/transportation/news/2019/20190618-Sammamish-Community-Ride.aspx

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    What type of investments would make transit a more convenient option for you? The two options are not enough choices and the question is biased. My selfish answer would be service that covers more of Sammamish since I will NEVER drive up to the Plateau to reach a park n ride. Indeed, I have commuted by bus to downtown Seattle and I drove to the Issaquah Transit Center to catch the 214 or 554. But using this poll for any purpose other than cocktail hour conversation seems meaningless since the questions are designed to get the predetermined preferred result.

    DebbieTreen Asked about 1 year ago

    The questions/quick polls are a way to get feedback from the community in a way that is easy, accessible, and sparks interest in the TMP.  The TMP Project Team has not stated that these are scientific and we do not intend to use the data as such.  The purpose is to hear from the community and understand resident preferences; the TMP Project Team does not have any preferred results.  The data helps us understand what the community feels about broad topic areas and the trade-offs that are inherent in them.  

    In addition to the questions/quick polls on the website, the TMP Project Team is implementing several other tools to ensure that we get well-rounded input from the community that is applicable, specific, and meaningful to the development of the TMP.  Two examples of this include a statistically valid survey, which will be deployed in October of this year, and a mapping tool on Connect Sammamish, which mimics the exercise we’re doing with the community at the public workshops. 

    All of this input will be part of the comprehensive project record, which includes everything we receive from the community on this planning effort, including workshop results, comment cards, letters, emails, and input received from Connect Sammamish.  This comprehensive look at the community’s preferences will be a major part of the TMP and will serve to directly inform the City Council’s decision to adopt the TMP.

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    What designs are being considered for the intersection of IPLR and the entry to Elementary School #16, which should begin construction in the next month? The publicly available plans for that school do not include a light or roundabout for that intersection and allow exit from the school only via a right turn.

    CharlyD Asked about 1 year ago

    The City is working closely with the Issaquah School District as it relates to the Elementary School #16 entrance onto Issaquah Pine Lake Road (IPLR) and maintaining the current construction schedule.  The current design is to extend the school driveway to the south and align it with the SE 44th Street intersection.  A temporary signal will be installed at the intersection until the City completes a road widening project along Issaquah Pine Lake Road and finalizes the intersection with a signal or roundabout.  The City is currently in design for this portion of Issaquah Pine Lake Road and is analyzing how both intersections will function together in the future.


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    Please can there be a narrow walking path between Ebright Park and Big Rock Park along 8th and 216th also. Currently you feel like you must dive into the ditch when a car comes along. There will be more traffic on these roads once the road at the top of the hill is completed. Yet there are many blind spots on 216th and still no shoulder !!! Please for the safety of all and the use of our parks provide narrow walking shoulders (even gravel will do.)* *Originally posted on the "About" page

    about 1 year ago

    The 216th/217th/218th Corridor will be the subject of a study that is currently underway.  Safety concerns will be evaluated under this study.  Furthermore, there is a project identified in the TMP preliminary projects list that addresses safety for all modes of transportation along this corridor, including pedestrians.  The description of this project is as follows, “Widen the road to 3 lanes with a median/two-way left turn lane, bike lanes, curb, gutter and sidewalk from 212th Avenue SE to SE 4th Street.”  To show support for a particular project, it is recommended that you continue to engage with us on the TMP and, in particular, come to one of the public workshops being held in August.  At these workshops, the community will get a chance to discuss potential projects in Sammamish and vote on which ones they support the City investing in.

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    Can we get a protected bike lane that has a buffer from the road that is NOT on the street both up and down the hill to East Lake Sammamish trail. It feels so dangerous to be sharing the road with cars on the way up and down to the lake trail. We need two or three ways to get down to the lake (north, south, and middle) without having to travel too far out of the way. I was hoping 212th was going to be that road but the road gets "scary" the farther down the road you get towards the lake. 24th is another option. There are pretty good bike lanes in the other connector roads around Pine Lake now. The other problem (maybe the most dangerous) is crossing 228th, it would be nice to have an over pass or under tunnel for bikes and pedestrians at a few of the major intersections. 30th and 228th would be really nice to the park and ride. These are the only two major dangerous issues that make cycling to work a bit sketchy. Once on the East Lake Sammamish trail, it is basically paradise now.

    nschwerzler Asked about 1 year ago

    The provision of bicycle facilities that are buffered from street traffic and connect between the Plateau and the East Lake Sammamish Trail, requires coordination between the City’s TMP project team and the Parks Department staff to consider how these connections could potentially be made through trail corridors. Maps 9 and 10 of the City’s 2018 Parks, Recreation, and Open Space Plan (PRO Plan), see Pages 139 and 141 of the PDF, show trail concepts that could make the types of connections you suggest.  The TMP will support this inter-departmental coordination, particularly as related to input received from the community relating to these types of off-street trails. 

    Your comments about the difficulties for bike and pedestrians in crossing 228th Avenue are also well received. The safety and comfort of pedestrian and cyclists crossing major arterials will be discussed in the TMP. To further advocate for projects, it is recommended that you continue to engage with us on the TMP and, in particular, come to one of the public workshops being held in August.  At these workshops, the community will get a chance to discuss potential projects in Sammamish and vote on which ones they support the City investing in.

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    The picture shows a glorious photo taken by Big Rock Park. It would be so nice to be able to access City Hall from Big Rock Park via pedestrian trail. Is this in the works? It seems pretty easy. Looks like the council voted not to take some property through eminent domain but not much would be needed. It would be so nice to have this park connected.

    salsababs Asked about 1 year ago

    The City Council recently considered a trail connection between Big Rock Park and City Hall/Sammamish Commons, but ultimately decided to explore alternative routes, which were reviewed but not pursued due to significant challenges.  This project is currently on hold, but may be addressed in the future at a time to be determined.

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    A lot of conversation has been around the public using mass transportation options such as buses. What is the city doing to assist in pedestrians using buses? There are currently limited sidewalks, crosswalks, lighting, or bus shelters. In manner areas, the bus stop is simply a sign placed on the shoulder of a busy arterial road with no other infrastructure to support it. Also, during times of inclement weather, the city has zero plans in place to maintain or shovel snow off of city sidewalks. Is there a plan in place to change this as the pro-mass transit conversation continues?

    about 1 year ago

    Access to transit facilities is an important element in facilitating the use of bus transit in Sammamish.  This is an issue at the north end of Sammamish, along Sahalee Way NE, where pedestrian facilities are minimal.  On June 18th, the Sammamish City Council adopted the 2020 - 2025 Transportation Improvement Plan (TIP), which included a capital project to address several issues along Sahalee Way NE.  This project, if constructed, will include pedestrian facilities that will help residents safely and easily access the City's major bus transit corridor, 228th Avenue/Sahalee Way.  

    To show support for a particular project, it is recommended that residents continue to engage with the TMP effort, including attending one of the three public workshops being held in August.  

    Finally, the City does not clear sidewalks during inclement weather, as limited resources are instead focused on clearing priority areas of the City (e.g. 228th Avenue) for vehicular access, particularly emergency vehicles.

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    Who is responsible for maintaining SE 48th Street? I live on the Sammamish side and have heard Issaquah is responsible but when I talk to Issaquah people they said it’s Sammamish. Also why is there no sidewalk or warning sign to alert drivers of the many many pedestrians who use this street?

    AMMik Asked about 1 year ago

    The City of Sammamish maintains the entire Right-of-Way (ROW) of SE 48th Street.  Recent residential development on the south side of this road (in Issaquah) has built some sidewalks, but gaps still remain.  The City is aware of the sidewalk gaps and has identified a project on our preliminary TMP projects list to address the gap on both sides from Issaquah-Pine Lake Road to 227th Place SE.  To show support for a particular project, it is recommended that you continue to engage with us on the TMP and, in particular, come to one of the three public workshops being held in August.  At these workshops, the community will get a chance to discuss potential projects in Sammamish and vote on which ones they support the City investing in.

    Additionally, to report immediate concerns with safety issues, such as signage, it is recommended that you use the City's new app, My Sammamish Fix It, which you can learn more about here: https://www.sammamish.us/how-do-i/my-sammamish-fix-it/.

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    Why isn't there a light at the intersection of Beaver Lake Road and 256th out of Klahanie? During the construction on Fall City Road I hear that we'll have a temporary roundabout there, but I was wondering why we're not getting a permanent one. It's really needed. Thank you!

    auntgirl Asked about 1 year ago

    The intersection of SE Issaquah-Beaver Lake Road and 256th Avenue SE is a large intersection, which currently does not have an all-way traffic control device, just the two stop-controlled side streets.  This intersection is best suited for a round-about instead of a signal, given the neighboring context and characteristics of the intersection.  A round-about will also add to the character of this road by allowing for landscaping to be installed.

    As part of the Issaquah-Fall City Road (IFCR) project, a temporary round-about will be installed at this intersection.  This temporary round-about will eventually be enhanced and turned into a permanent round-about to control all traffic at this intersection.  The timing of making the temporary round-about permanent is still being determined, but will follow the completion of the IFCR project.